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9-12 Curriculum

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate from Summit High School, a student must complete 130 credits during the course of grades 9-12. Satisfactory completion of a full-year course earns five credits; students, therefore, must gain credit for 26 full-year courses (or the equivalent) to earn a diploma. The courses may be taken in any department or subject areas, but they must include:

Subject Credit Required

English 20

World History 5

U.S. History 10

Mathematics 15

Science 15

World Language 5

Visual and Performing Arts 5

Career, Family and Consumer,

Life Skills and

Vocational-Technical Education 5

Financial Literacy 2.5

Health and Physical Education 20

Minimum Additional Credits 27.5

Total needed for graduation: 130

Please note that for the Class of 2015, specific course requirements must be met in math and science. Specifically, a student must complete Algebra 1 and Geometry as well as Biology and one additional laboratory science course within the fifteen-credit requirement.

Beginning with the Class of 2016, students must complete Algebra 2 or higher-level math as well as Algebra 1 and Geometry for their fifteen-credit math requirement, and a lab course in Physics, Chemistry, or Environmental Science. This is in addition to Biology and one additional lab science course within the fifteen-credit requirement.

Students may demonstrate proficiency in a World Language in lieu of the five-credit requirement.

As a requirement for graduation students must also pass proficiency tests as determined by the New Jersey Department of Education. Currently, these are to include PARCC assessments in English, language arts and mathematics, as well as an end of course biology assessment. Please go to the ASSESSMENT TAB for additional information on PARCC and other assessments.

Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment

English/Language Arts

The building blocks of the English Language Arts—phonics, reading, writing, speaking, listening and grammar—are the means through which people learn to communicate with one another and, indeed, the world at large. These facets of communication allow us to receive information, to respond to it by applying both logical and creative thought, and to express our ideas in many varied formats, including verbal, nonverbal, and written forms. Literacy, as defined by the State of New Jersey Department of Education, is “. . . a way to acquire knowledge for thinking and communicating; it is more than the acquisition of a specific, predetermined set of skills in reading, writing, speaking, listening, and viewing. Literacy is also recognizing and understanding one’s own purposes for thinking and communicating (through print or non-print, verbal or nonverbal means) and being able to use one’s own resources to achieve those purposes.”

Within our curriculum documents, the areas of reading, writing, foundational skills, speaking, listening, and grammar are addressed at each grade level, meeting the standards set forth by the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts. Because the English Language Arts are so highly integrated and interdependent, a balanced approach to instruction is therefore required. Characteristically, the development of literacy skills requires a spiraled curriculum where concepts are introduced, developed, and reinforced. Once introduced, most skills are repeatedly revisited within that grade level. They are reinforced in successive grade levels with increasing rigor and in greater depth.

Because every learner is an individual with specialized educational needs, the Summit Public Schools presents its rigorous curriculum through the application of differentiated instructional strategies. Direct and explicit instruction as well as the application of research-based instructional strategies, such as problem-based learning, cooperative learning techniques, teacher and peer modeling, and the regular implementation of formative authentic assessments are fostered.

Mr. Corey Walsh, Supervisor of English, Language Arts 9-12 and Media Literacy PK-12

908-918-2100 x 5545

email


ENGLISH 1 Grade 9

The major emphasis of English 1 is upon the skills of communication, both written and oral. Students, as both producers and consumers of language, will receive instruction in communication by speaking, listening, reading, writing, viewing and researching. A focus on the fundamentals of the writing process is an integral part of the course. In addition, students will be

instructed in the use of library resources and in study skills. A research project, as well as various types of narrative and expository essays, will be expected.

English 1

GLOBAL STUDIES Grade 9

This one-year interdisciplinary Global Studies class is a double-period course that combines freshmen year English and world history. Global Studies creates an environment that encourages students to make connections between world literature and world history. This course will trace the development and contributions of civilizations in different parts of the world. Primary

emphasis is placed on the history and literature of cultures in Europe, the Far East, Africa and the Americas. The course will begin with a review of the major political and cultural legacies of the classical and medieval worlds, and it will end with the major global events of the 20th century and the post W.W. II era of globalization. Students will examine themes and

literature that address current political, social, and economic trends and events that influence today’s world. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills that allow students to understand the past and apply those skills to questions they will encounter in the future. A research project, as well as various types of narrative and expository essays, will be expected.

ENGLISH 2 Grade 10

English 2 will target a student's growth in the areas of reading comprehension, the writing

process, oral presentations, and media literacy. The thematic focus of the course is on the human condition as it is represented in literature. Students will be able to develop an idea clearly and logically, to refine skills of reading and

writing for understanding, and to apply research, study, and library skills. A research project, as well as various types of expository and persuasive essays, will be expected. In addition, a significant summer assignment will precede the start of the course.

English 2

ENGLISH 2 HONORS Grade 10

This course is offered to selected students whose past performance and intellectual interests give promise of their being able to work at an advanced level. Strong reading and writing proficiencies are essential skills in this program. This course will increase and refine a student's skills in the areas of analytic reading, the writing process, delivering a speech, and viewing and media literacy. The thematic focus of the course is on the human condition as it is represented in literature. Students will be able to develop an idea clearly and logically, to refine skills of literary criticism, and to understand and apply research, study, and library skills. A research project, as well as various types of expository and persuasive essays, will be expected. In addition, a significant summer assignment will precede the start of the course.

English 2 Honors

ENGLISH 3 Grade 11

English 3 provides students with the opportunity to acquire a deeper understanding of literary analysis, a stronger familiarity with the research process, and a heightened sophistication in written work. Students will be guided in the writing process with an emphasis on oral and written argument, as well as analysis of images and language. A research project, as well as

various types of persuasive and analytic essays, will be expected.

English 3

ENGLISH 3 HONORS Grade 11

This course is offered to students whose past performance and demonstration of intellectual interests warrant their selection for advanced study. Works studied will include both classic and contemporary American literature, with a concentration on fiction. In addition to reading novels, students will read essays, poems, dramas, and critical material. The students will achieve the course objectives through reading and analysis, through class discussion, by preparing and presenting oral reports, by sharing and evaluating written work, by working in cooperative groups, and through project-based learning. A research project, as well as various types of persuasive and analytic essays, will be expected. In addition, a significant

summer assignment will precede the start of the course.

English 3 Honors

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION Grade 11

AP English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of periods, disciplines, and rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Students will become aware of a writer's purpose and audience expectations. The emphasis will be on reading non-fiction selections: correspondence, journals, autobiography and memoir, biography, articles, and essays. The intense concentration on language use in this course will enhance the student’s ability to use grammatical conventions, and understand and use

rhetorical and linguistic choices. Selected genres from American Literature will be explored. Students will study past AP exams to be able to recognize readily the effective use of rhetoric, including controlling tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure. A substantial summer assignment will precede the beginning of the course. A research project, as well as writing focused on persuasion, analysis, and synthesis, will be expected. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP English 3

ENGLISH 4 Grade 12

English 4 continues to stress growth in analysis and close reading strategies in honing the writing process and in developing voice in speaking and writing. The curriculum emphasizes the refinement of cognitive processes, especially those of analysis and synthesis. Students are encouraged to respond both emotionally and intellectually to the literature studied, and to

become more aware of the value of language as a system of creating meaning. Students will write papers and create projects relevant to class discussion and readings. Literature will be chosen from a varied list of classic and contemporary literature from a range of periods and cultures. A research project, as well as essays that emphasize analysis and synthesis, will be expected.

English 4

ENGLISH 4 HONORS Grade 12

This course is offered to students whose past performance and demonstration of intellectual interests warrants their selection for advanced study. English 4 Honors involves students in a study of the social, cultural and historical impact of

literature. Through careful reading and critical analysis, students explore works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry and prose from different cultures and time periods. Students deepen their understanding of the ways literature reflects and influences the world in which we live by investigating and drawing connections among a number of literary traditions. Regular writing assignments will focus on the cultural and historical context of literature and will include analytical, argumentative, and imaginative pieces. In addition, a significant summer assignment will precede the start of the course. A research project is required.

English 4 Honors

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH

LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION Grade 12

The Advanced Placement course in English Literature and Composition involves students in the careful reading and critical analysis of literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. Students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes as well as such smaller scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. The course includes intensive study of representative works from various genres and periods, concentrating on works of recognized literary merit from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century. Students are expected to read meticulously, taking time to understand a work’s

complexity, to absorb its richness of meaning, and to analyze how that meaning is embodied in literary form. Regular writing assignments will focus on critical and historical context of literature and will include analytical, argumentative, as well as imaginative pieces. In addition, a significant summer assignment will precede the start of the course. A research project is required. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP English 4

English Electives

The elective courses are intended to supplement interest in a given area of study and may not be taken in place of English 1, 2, 3, and 4 or Honors and AP sections of these courses.

CREATIVE WRITING 1 Grades 10-11-12

Creative Writing is a one-semester course intended to allow the student to explore aspects of professional fiction writing. Emphasis is placed on the techniques of refining original ideas into polished fiction. Areas to be covered include writing, revising, and marketing the short story, poem, screenplay, and song lyric.

Creative Writing 1

CREATIVE WRITING 2 Grades 11-12

Creative Writing 2 is a one-semester course for those students who wish to continue exploring writing and publishing fiction. The course is open to those students who have successfully completed Creative Writing 1, and it allows the techniques developed in that previous course to be examined at a deeper level. Fiction writing will be longer and more extensively crafted and analyzed. Areas covered include the dramatic stage play, the full-length screenplay, longer poetry, the short story, the novella, and the memoir.

Creative Writing 2

21st CENTURY MEDIA AND COMMUNICATIONS Grades 9-10-11-12

21ST Century Media and Communications is a one-semester course for students interested in learning about the consumption and production of media in the digital age. Students in this course will learn to become active, analytical, and critical consumers of media through the study of digital and web-based forms. Students will develop the skills to construct meaning from media, analyze and compare the use of verbal and visual messages in the arts, advertising and news media, and study the growth and impact of 21st century media on their lives and their culture. Students will also produce projects that demonstrate their practical understanding of these skills. Products may include podcasts, vodcasts, multimedia slide shows, video/audio “newscasts,” blogs, short films, etc.

21st Century Media & Communications

HUMANITIES: THE FINEST IN LITERATURE AND THE ARTS Grades 11-12

Humanities, examines the development of Western Culture from the Classical Period through the Modern Era. Representative examples of art, architecture, philosophy, music, drama, dance, film, photography, history, criticism, ethics, literature, and law are examined. This interdisciplinary examination of Western Culture provides students with many opportunities for speaking, listening, thinking, viewing, interpreting, writing, researching, and understanding.

Humanities

FILM STUDIES Grades 10-11-12

Film studies is a one-semester course whose primary focus is the analysis of the language of film. Its central premise is that students are bombarded with visual storytelling yet they possess few critical skills for intelligently and technically examining this material. This course will enable students to speak and write with clarity about editing, visual composition, and use of music, color, and angle. Students will become fluent in the critical scrutiny of recognized masterpieces of the cinema; time will also be devoted to script-writing and film production using portable video cameras.

Film Studies

JOURNALISM 1 Grades 9-10

Journalism 1 is a one-semester course, which offers students entry-level exposure to the monthly production of the SHS student newspaper. Students will learn journalistic writing skills such as creating compelling article leads, headlines, and captions. Writers will be challenged to develop a succinct and logical prose style. Student reporters will also learn the basics of conducting effective interviews, crafting probing questions, and identifying real sources for hard news articles. The basic elements of page design/layout will be introduced using computer software.

Journalism 1

JOURNALISM 2 Grades 10-11

Journalism 2 is a full-year course open to students who have completed Journalism I and expressed a firm commitment to the continued production of the SHS newspaper. Advanced responsibilities of upper-level staff will include editorial decisions for feature articles, columns, personality profiles, photo essays, film and music reviews. The nature of journalistic ethics will

be critiqued and provide the foundation for responsible reportage. By examining design and circulation trends in other national and scholastic newspapers, students will evaluate their final product and work to refine all elements of the production process including advertising and distribution. Editorial staff members who have successfully completed Journalism 1 may register for this course.

Journalism 2

JOURNALISM 3 Grades 11-12

Journalism 3 is a full-year course for the editorial staff of Verve. This is a production course with emphasis on editorial policy and the study and evaluations of national, regional, and local publications. Students must successfully complete Journalism 2 to register for the class.

Journalism 3

JOURNALISM 4 Grade 12

Journalism 4 is a full-year course for the editorial staff of Verve. This is a production course with emphasis on editorial policy, and the study and evaluations of national, regional and local publications. Students must successfully complete Journalism 3 to register for the class.

Journalism 4

POETRY Grades 9-12

Poetry is a one-semester workshop course open to grades 9-12, which consists of reading and writing poetry, listening to and recording poetry, and consuming and producing multi-media projects including and about poetry. Students use writing prompts gathered from a variety of sources and read and discuss poetry selected by classmates and the teacher. Publishing and delivering poetry to an audience is an integral part of the course, with a focus on live readings, the Summit High School literary magazine, Quintessence, as well as teen-oriented online and print literary magazines, forums, and contests.

Poetry

READING AND WRITING STRATEGIES Grades 9-10

Students identified as partially proficient in the Language Arts section of NJASK 8 may be assigned to Reading and Writing Strategies. This program uses individualized and small-group instruction to help the students develop mastery of the basic skills. Reading comprehension will be strengthened through a variety of materials including the daily newspaper, magazines, plays, short stories, and fiction, as well as skill exercises. Special attention will also be directed to vocabulary-building activities including such skills as the use of the dictionary, use of context clues, and recognition of prefixes, roots, synonyms and antonyms. A writing component using computers will reinforce the mastery of basic skills.

Reading and Writing Strategies

Mathematics

To function effectively as citizens and consumers, all students need to learn to enjoy and appreciate the value of mathematics and develop the mathematical skills they must have for varied educational and career options. Strong foundations in number sense and numerical operations form a basis for the successful use of mathematics.

Students best acquire mathematics skills when they are engaged in activities that enable them to discover, understand, and apply mathematical concepts. When students are challenged to use mathematics in meaningful ways, they develop their reasoning and problem-solving skills and come to realize the usefulness of mathematics in their lives. The Board of Education has set a goal to make Summit the leader in STEAM education by 2018. STEAM--Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts (design) and Mathematics--is an integrated way to deliver curriculum and instruction offering problem-based authentic opportunities for learning. This approach is reflected in many courses across the curriculum.

Students preparing for careers in the information-based economy of the twenty-first century must be able to solve real problems, reason effectively, and make logical connections. To enable all students to gain the necessary mathematical skills, understandings and attitudes, instruction needs to focus on the “whys” and “hows” of mathematical learning:

1. Pose and solve real world problems.

2. Effectively communicate mathematical ideas.

3. Make connections within mathematics and between mathematics and other areas.

4. Provide opportunities for active student involvement.

5. Use of technology.

When math is taught in a problem-solving spirit, students are interested in what they are doing and are more likely to understand the material. Instructional strategies that allow students to talk and write about math helps to clarify and solidify their thinking and develop confidence in themselves as mathematical thinkers.

Mathematics learning is not dependent on special abilities but can be achieved by all students by using organizational strategies such flexible grouping, cooperative learning, individualized and whole class instruction, differentiating instructional strategies, and by developing achievable high-level expectations.

Students will develop positive attitudes toward mathematics when they are taught in a supportive, developmentally appropriate environment, when all students’ mathematical learning embodies the notion that engagement in mathematics is essential, and where decision-making, risk-taking, perseverance, self-assessment, and self-confidence are frequently the keys to success.

In order to graduate from Summit High School, students must successfully complete three full-year mathematics courses.

Mr. Donald Tobey, Supervisor of Mathematics, 9-12

908-918-2100 x 5584

email

FOUNDATIONS OF ALGEBRA Grades 9-10-11-12

Foundations of Algebra is intended for students who are prepared to begin their exploration of Algebra 1 and to obtain mastery of the skills, techniques, and concepts necessary for success in future mathematics courses. The course includes an exploration of the properties of the real number system, fundamental operations with real numbers and variables, solving equations, inequalities, linear and non-linear relationships, linear systems, data analysis and probability. Students will develop these concepts numerically, graphically, and analytically. Real-world applications will be explored throughout

the course.

Being revised summer 2014

ALGEBRA 1 – Modeling with Functions Grades 9–10–11–12

Algebra 1 will focus on solving systems of equations, exploring linear, quadratic, exponential, and rational functions, and manipulating radical, polynomial, and rational expressions. Emphasis will be placed on the application of these concepts in real world settings and methods for modeling real world scenarios using these functions. Graphing calculators are used

throughout this course to further develop each concept.

Algebra 1

GEOMETRY Grades 9-10-11-12

This course is Euclidean geometry and includes congruence, similarity, parallelism, perpendicularity, area, volume, and circles. Coordinates and transformations in both two and three dimensions are integrated throughout the course. There is a main sequence of proved theorems with many "originals" for the student to prove.

Being revised summer 2014

GEOMETRY HONORS Grades 9-10 5 Credits

The course is Euclidean geometry and includes congruence, similarity, parallelism, perpendicularity, area, and volume. Coordinates and transformations in both two and three dimensions are integrated throughout the course. There is a main sequence of proved theorems with many "originals" for the student to prove. This course includes the regular Geometry course content, but with an increased degree of rigor and greater depth of study.

Geometry Honors

ALGEBRA 2 Grades 10-11-12

Algebra 2 is a continuation of work begun in Algebra l and Geometry. This course emphasizes facility with algebraic expressions and forms, especially linear and quadratic forms, powers and roots, and functions based on these concepts. Students study exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and other special functions for their abstract properties and as tools for modeling real-world situations. Geometric ideas are utilized throughout, and matrices are examined conceptually and applied.

Algebra 2

ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY Grades 10-11-12

Algebra 2/Trigonometry continues with more advanced study in mathematics after geometry. The algebraic properties of the real number system are reviewed, as are equations and inequalities of the first and second degree. The real number system is extended to the complex number system. Conic sections are given geometric application. Coordinate geometry, systems

of equations, and logarithmic, exponential, trigonometric, and polynomial functions are instructed in detail.

Algebra 2 Trig

ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY HONORS Grades 10-11

Algebra 2/Trigonometry Honors continues with more advanced study in mathematics after geometry. The algebraic properties of the real number system are reviewed, as are equations and inequalities of the first and second degree. The real number system is extended to the complex number system. Conic sections are given geometric application. Coordinate geometry, systems of equations, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, trigonometric, and circular functions are studied in detail. Matrices and probability are covered as time permits.

ALGEBRA 2/TRIGONOMETRY HONORS

TRIGONOMETRY/ALGEBRA 3 Grades 11-12

Trigonometry Algebra 3 integrates ideas of functions and trigonometry with statistics and data analysis. The course reviews and extends ideas about polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Statistical and algebraic concepts are integrated as students display, describe, transform, interpret, and model numerical data. The study of counting, probability, and simulation is also included.

TRIGONOMETRY/ALGEBRA 3

PRE-CALCULUS Grades 11-12

Pre-Calculus develops the ideas associated with circular, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. The various functions are applied to real world situations. Additional topics are polar coordinates, sequences and series, and an introduction to matrices.

Pre-Calculus

PRE-CALCULUS HONORS Grades 10-11-12

Pre-Calculus Honors will prepare students for the rigorous AP Calculus AB curriculum. It will develop

Pre-Calculus topics in greater depth and at a challenging level that will expose students to the future demands of an Advanced Placement course. Topics that will be explored include circular, trigonometric, parametric, exponential, and logarithmic functions, vectors, polar coordinates, sequences and series, and an introduction to limits and derivatives.

INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS HONORS Grades 10-11-12

The first semester of this course explores precalculus topics such as polynomial functions, trigonometry, conic sections, exponents and logarithms, mathematical induction, and miscellaneous topics from advanced algebra and analytic geometry. The second semester includes a rigorous exploration of topics in calculus and includes limits, continuity, definition of derivative, derivatives of algebraic functions, and applications of derivatives. The calculus in this course is continued in the BC Calculus course. This course may require a summer assignment.

INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS HONORS

CALCULUS Grade 12

Calculus is offered as an alternative to the rigors of the Advanced Placement Calculus AB course. It includes an

exploration of the concept of a limit, derivatives, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals. Students investigate differentiation and integration using numerical, graphical, algebraic, and analytical methods. The use of a graphing calculator is expected as real-world applications are explored throughout the course.

CALCULUS

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS AB Grade 12

AP Calculus AB includes the concepts of limit, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, differentials, mean value theorem, Rolle's Theorem, integration of standard elementary forms, and transcendental functions. Geometric and physical applications include the area under a curve, volume of revolution, and velocity. Additional topics include differential equations and hyperbolic functions. All students enrolled in this class will be required to complete a summer curriculum assignment. This assignment is designed to review key mathematical topics that will be utilized throughout the course. Additionally, all students enrolled in an AP course will be required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP Calculus AB

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC/PHYSICS C Grades 11-12

AP Calculus BC/Physics C is an integrated course providing a continuation of the calculus work begun in Introduction to Analysis Honors and an introduction to the physics of mechanics. The course is taught during a two period block. Students receive grades for each class, which appear separately on report cards and transcripts. All students in this course will be required to complete a summer curriculum assignment. This assignment is designed to review key mathematical topics that will be utilized throughout the course. Additionally, all students enrolled in this class are required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam in May and the Physics C Mechanics section, and Physics C Electricity and Magnetism section of the Advanced Placement exam in May.

Calculus instruction includes the concept of limit, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, differentials, mean value theorem, Rolle's Theorem, integration of standard elementary forms, and transcendental functions. Geometric and physical applications include the area under a curve and between curves, volumes of revolution, length of a curve, surfaces of a revolution, and velocity. The BC syllabus covers the topics of the AB Calculus course in greater depth and with more rigor. Additional topics include polar graphs, infinite sequences and series, and differential equations. Students receive a graphing calculator for their use during the course.

Physics instruction includes kinematics, dynamics, statics, momentum, work, mechanical energy, power, linear systems, rotational systems, oscillations, and gravitation. The Physics C syllabus studies fewer topics than the Physics I and II course, but explores them in much greater depth.

AP Calculus BC

AP Physics C

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS Grade 12

AP Statistics deals with many facets of data analysis. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, and inferential statistics. Examples are taken from various fields. Technology is used extensively. This course will require a summer assignment. All students enrolled in this class are required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Statistics exam in May.

AP Statistics

STATISTICS AND DISCRETE MATHEMATICS Grade 12

Statistics and Discrete mathematics explores many facets of data analysis. Statistics topics include descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, and inferential statistics. Examples will be taken from various fields. Topics in Discrete Mathematics include combinatorics, graph theory, network theory, coding theory, and Euler circuits. Discrete Mathematics offers another opportunity to have students experience the application of mathematics in real world settings. Specific topics explored might include combinations and permutations, scheduling a complex tournament, and defining a most efficient delivery route or network of communication. Technology is used extensively.

Statistics and Discrete Mathematics

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS Grade 12

Multivariable Calculus is offered as an online independent study experience. This course is a rigorous study of Multivariable Calculus. It is a challenging exploration of functions of several variables and includes the examination of such functions through the use of vectors and matrices, differentiation and integration, optimization, parametric curves and

surfaces, and vector fields while also exploring real world applications. Students receive a graphing calculator for their use throughout the course.

Being revised summer 2014

FINANCIAL LITERACY AND PERSONAL FINANCE Grades 11-12

This course fulfills the State of New Jersey financial literacy requirement for high school graduation.

Using project-based instruction and real-world simulations, Financial Literacy and Personal Finance provides students the

opportunity to explore the key aspects of personal finances necessary to be successful now and throughout their adult lives. The primary structure of this semester class focuses on the examination of authentic situations. Through these experiences, students develop skills, gather data, and formulate the strategies needed to gain personal and financial responsibility related to financial planning, savings, investments, and charitable giving in the global community. Exploring the relationships among income and careers, money management, credit and debt management, risk management and investing, insurance, and taxes the student will become an educated and critical consumer.

FINANCIAL LITERACY AND PERSONAL FINANCE

MATHEMATICS FOR PERSONAL FINANCE Grades 11-12

This course fulfills the State of New Jersey financial literacy requirement for high school graduation.

Mathematics for Personal FInance is a practical mathematics course intended to further develop mathematical skills, to increase the ability to make personal decisions based on mathematical or business concepts, and to increase the student’s ability to manage personal business (consumer) affairs.

Personal Finance

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (ELECTIVE) Grades 9 -10-11-12

Introduction to Computer Programming has been developed to simultaneously introduce students to computer

programming and to prepare them for an introductory course in the formal JAVA language. Students learn to program stories and games in the Alice programming environment with a focus on the critical knowledge and skills that may be applied in future classes. Students will learn to create and manipulate object classes and to use these manipulations to develop program animations. As they progress, students learn to program using a variety of diverse techniques including if/else statements loops, while and for statements, as well as techniques unique to the Alice program.

Intro to Computer Programming

INTRODUCTION TO JAVA PROGRAMMING (ELECTIVE) Grades 9-10-11-12

This semester course serves as a direct follow up to the “Introduction to Computer Programming” course

and introduces students to the Java programming language. Topics discussed in this class mirror those taught in the “Introduction to Computer Programming” course including a wide variety of techniques such as if/else statements,

loops, while and for statements. In addition, students learn about object-oriented programming and public and private classes.

Computer Programming 2

ADVANCED PLACEMENT COMPUTER PROGRAMMING Grades 10-11-12

This course is equivalent to a semester of college level computer programming.

The Advanced Placement Computer Science class is designed to prepare students for the AP Computer Science A examination. In this class, students will learn how to develop and write Java programs utilizing object-oriented program design. Topics include implementation techniques, programming constructs and programming analysis with an overall focus on top-down development. In addition, students learn how to test and debug their programs, as well as utilize error handling to address runtime errors. All students enrolled in an AP course will be required to prepare for and take the AP exam in

May.

AP Computer Programming

MATHEMATICS STRATEGIES Grades 9-10

Students who have been identified as partially proficient on the mathematics section of the NJASK 8 will be assigned to the Mathematics Strategies course in addition to their regularly scheduled mathematics class. This program is designed to help prepare students to develop mastery of the basic skills. Course content is based on the proficiencies and performance objectives described within the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics including the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

Mathematical Strategies




Science

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Science

July 9, 2014 The NJ State Board of Education adopted the Next Generation Science Standards. As we begin to receive information we will post it and share with the community.

Science is a process of investigating the natural and physical world. In the 21 st century, the major objective of science education is to promote the development of scientifically literate citizens. These citizens understand how science, technology and society influence each other. Science literacy includes the ability to:

  • Find or determine answers to questions derived from everyday experiences.
  • Describe, explain, and predict natural phenomena.
  • Understand articles written about science.
  • Engage in non-technical conversation about the validity of conclusions.
  • Identify scientific issues underlying national and local decisions.
  • Pose explanations based on evidence derived from individual work and research.

The scientifically literate person has a knowledge base of facts, concepts and process skills that enable them to think logically and critically. Science process skills include communicating, measuring, observing, predicting, identifying variables, formulating hypotheses and experimenting.

In addition to the NJ Core Content Curriculum Standards for Science, the English language arts (ELA) Common Core Standards include supplemental guidelines for literacy in science and technical subjects. Teachers of science use their content area expertise to help students meet the particular requirements of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and using language effectively for college, career, and life readiness. Using primary and secondary sources, students are challenged and asked questions that push them to refer back to and to apply what they’ve read, emphasizing critical-thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills. Within our curriculum documents the standards are addressed at each grade level with increasing rigor and in greater depth.

From the elementary grades through high school, science education is designed to provide learning outcomes that prepare students to use science to make everyday decisions and to solve everyday problems. Science education stresses the process and spirit of scientific inquiry. As a result, the methods of learning science reflect the methods of doing science. This approach allows students at all grade levels to become active participants in the process of scientific investigation.

In order to graduate from Summit High School, students must successfully complete15 hours of science courses including physics and biology.


Mr. Thomas O'Dowd, Supervisor of Science, 9-12

908-918-2100 x 5575

email

PHYSICS Grade 9

Physics is the first in the sequence of high school science courses. Physics attempts to describe the fundamental nature of the universe and how it works. Physics is the most core of sciences and is the logical first step for a student to discovering high school science. There is a strong inquiry-based learning approach to all topics and students are provided with a conceptual understanding of the laws that govern the very big and the very small. Foundational arithmetic and introductory algebra skills are utilized to help students understand and apply concepts. Laboratory investigations are emphasized so that students gain practice in problem solving and with the communication of laboratory findings. Physics is the basis for achieving scientific literacy, and to achieving success in the other science courses offered at Summit High School.

Physics

HONORS PHYSICS Grade 9

Honors Physics is designed for a student who has demonstrated exceptional ability in both mathematics and science. This course involves an in depth treatment of the laws that govern the universe. Topics include mechanics, energy, waves, and electrostatics among others. This course uses mathematics as a tool to further understand and to make predictions about physical science laws. A strong foundation in algebra is essential to success in this course. This course provides a study of atomic physics that is the foundation for students who choose to take AP Biology or AP Chemistry as the next course in their sequence.

Honors Physics

SCIENCE RESEARCH 1 Grades 9-10

This is a single semester science research class designed for students with a strong interest in science, and who choose science research as their focus at this point in their academic career. This is a hands-on, experimental class featuring student inspired long-term research projects under faculty guidance. Students will learn how to properly conduct scientific experiments, to keep an appropriate science notebook, and will also be provided cutting edge scientific literature for research and review. Students will have the opportunity to pursue their own interests and will learn the unique value of peer reviewed scientific literature. This course is a stepping-stone for science research that could result in participation in prestigious science research competitions.

Science Research

SCIENCE RESEARCH II Grades 9-10

This is a single semester science research class designed for students with a strong interest in science, and who choose to pursue some of their free time doing authentic scientific research. Students begin by researching and fine-tuning their

specific interests in a scientific field and then strengthen their scientific background in their area of interest. Meeting regularly with their faculty advisor for topic guidance and to report on progress, students also contact and interview with professionals, choosing a mentor in a local university or industry. In this course students will develop and write a formal research proposal, as well as being assigned a variety of lab activities, team and individual projects to hone their problem solving skills, and to help them to better understand experimental design and data analysis.

Science Research

ADVANCED SCIENCE RESEARCH Grades 10-11

This is a single semester science research class designed for students who are looking to continue authentic scientific research and/or a science research project begun in Science Research II. Students will be refining a sophisticated research project in the laboratory requiring long periods of continuous experimentation, research, and data analysis. Working with professionals and advisors to prepare the research for presentation outside the school, students will participate in an on-going process of both peer and mentor review that may continue for multiple semesters, and resulting in the student's active involvement in a variety of science fairs and competitions.

BIOLOGY Grade 10

Biology is a college-preparatory laboratory course designed to provide general knowledge of the structural and functional patterns of living organisms. Students are required to master and apply major biological concepts in preparation for the state mandated End-of-Course exam administered to all students in May. Cells, genetics, evolution, and taxonomy are emphasized. Expectations include developing research skills and improving the ability to investigate problems scientifically. Students also develop an understanding of environmental problems, and how biological concepts are used to evaluate the actions taken to improve daily life.

Biology

ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY Grade 10-11-12

AP Biology is designed to meet the objectives of a general biology course on the college level. Extensive reading is required. Special emphasis is placed on cell physiology, genetics, and energy flow. Extra laboratory periods are required during the school day. This course will require a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May. In addition, all students are required to prepare for and take the state mandated End-of-Course exam administered in May.

AP Biology

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (ELECTIVE) Grades 11-12

Anatomy and Physiology is a single semester course. Through the study of physiology, the normal functioning of body systems, students learn about the anatomy of the human body and are guided on a tour through the human body following such themes as obesity, diseases, and smoking. How does the body work? How does the body break down? How does the body heal? Students discover the fascinating integrated systems in our bodies.

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

MARINE BIOLOGY/OCEANOGRAPHY (ELECTIVE) Grades 11-12

Marine Biology/Oceanography is a one-semester course for students who will learn about the life and physiology of the seas. Designed as a continuation of biology and earth science, there is an emphasis on both life in the ocean and the physical aspects that shape this dominant feature of our planet. This course includes a hands-on trip to a nearby marine ecosystem.

MARINE BIOLOGY/OCEANOGRAPHY

ZOOLOGY (ELECTIVE) Grades 11-12

Zoology is a single semester study of the animal kingdom offered as an in class, or as an online option. Through the themes of evolution and comparative anatomy, students learn about the fascinating characteristics of animals and their unique abilities. How and why did some of these unusual traits come into existence? Students will obtain a deeper understanding of both ecosystems and evolution by examining the biodiversity that surrounds us.

Zoology

CHEMISTRY Grades 11-12

Chemistry is a full-year laboratory course which is part of a science sequence that includes biology and physics. Chemistry provides students with a working knowledge of atomic theory, chemical periodicity, the mole concept, and energy changes in chemical reactions. Extensive laboratory work and problem solving are used to develop understanding of equilibrium, rates of reaction, and oxidation-reduction.

Chemistry

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY Grades 11-12

AP Chemistry is designed for students who have demonstrated both aptitude for and interest in the sciences. Students will learn the basic principles of chemistry including, fundamental concepts of matter and energy, structure and properties of atoms and molecules, chemical bonding and properties of aggregates, and principles of reactions. Descriptive chemistry will be used by students to study all areas more effectively, and to understand how chemical phenomena are included in everyday activities. Extra laboratory periods are required during the school day. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP Chemistry

ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY (ELECTIVE) Grades 12

Advanced Topics in Chemistry is a one semester course designed for students who are interested in broadening their awareness and knowledge of Chemistry. Organic chemistry, physical chemistry and analytical chemistry will be explored in more detail than the regular chemistry course, and will explore the relationship between application of chemistry and the discovery process. How do chemists build new compounds for treatment of diseases? How do the properties of new compounds effect their usefulness? What are some of the analytical tools used to identify and quantify substances? How is chemical research and development driven by the market?

ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

HONORS PHYSICS (11/12) Grades 11-12

Honors Physics (11/12) is offered as an alternative to the rigors of the Advanced Placement Physics courses for those sudents that did not take Honors Physics as a freshman. In Honors Physics, students will take an analytical approach to learn the laws that govern our universe. Topics addressed include kinematics, mechanics, momentum, work and energy rotational systems, fluids, waves, sound, light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics.

Honors Physics

ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS I & II Grades 11-12

Advanced Placement Physics I & II replaces AP Physics B, as required by the College Board. This is a fast-paced, mathematically demanding course providing students with a rigorous first-year noncalculus college physics course. Topics include mechanics, waves, thermodynamics, atomic physics, electricity and magnetism. Through lecture, demonstration, laboratory work, and problem-solving sessions, students develop a working knowledge of the topics and are required to assume considerable responsibility for extensive study, including collateral reading. Extra laboratory periods are required during the school day. All students are required to prepare for and take the AP Physics I & II exam in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS BC/PHYSICS C Grades 11-12

AP Calculus BC/Physics C is an integrated course providing a continuation of the calculus work begun in Introduction to Analysis Honors and an introduction to the physics of mechanics. The course is taught during a two period block. Students receive grades for each class, which appear separately on report cards and transcripts. All students in this course will be required to complete a summer curriculum assignment. This assignment is designed to review key mathematical topics that will be utilized throughout the course. Additionally, all students enrolled in this class are required to prepare for and take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC exam in May and the Physics C Mechanics section, and Physics C Electricity and Magnetism section of the Advanced Placement exam in May.

Calculus instruction includes the concept of limit, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions, differentials, mean value theorem, Rolle's Theorem, integration of standard elementary forms, and transcendental functions. Geometric and physical applications include the area under a curve and between curves, volumes of revolution, length of a curve, surfaces of a revolution, and velocity. The BC syllabus covers the topics of the AB Calculus course in greater depth and with more rigor. Additional topics include polar graphs, infinite sequences and series, and differential equations. Students receive a graphing calculator for their use during the course.

Physics instruction includes kinematics, dynamics, statics, momentum, work, mechanical energy, power, linear systems, rotational systems, oscillations, and gravitation. The Physics C syllabus studies fewer topics than the Physics I and II course, but explores them in much greater depth.

AP Calculus BC

AP Physics C

DESIGN PROJECTS IN PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING (ELECTIVE) Grade 12

Design Projects in Physics and Engineering is a single semester course that allows creative, analytical students with a strong mathematical aptitiude the opportunity to investigate these topics in a laboratory environment by experimenting and building. Topics studied in physics will be explored in greater depth as students create something that demonstrates these concepts and expands students' understanding of the physical world. Sample projects include batteries, sound generators and integrated circuits, Leyden jars, gliders, Wind Hurst machines, pinhole cameras and electromagnetic induction flashlights.

DESIGN PROJECTS IN PHYSICS AND ENGINEERING

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: ECOSYSTEMS AND MAN’S IMPACT Grades 11-12

Environmental Science: Ecosystems and Man's Impact is a semster course designed for students who have an interest in how ecosystems work and how man's behavior is changing them. Students are provided opportunities to explore the complex interactions within a well-functioning ecosystem and to examine the role man has played in disrupting these environments. There is a focus on inquiry based lab activities ias well as the opportunity to explore and investigate the local environment and develop action plans for issues. Students are expected to work independently and develop their personal agenda, which will allow them to "think globally and act locally."

Environmental Science Ecosystems

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: POPULATION DYNAMICS AND CASE STUDIES Grades 11-12

Environmental Science: Population Dynamics and Case Studies is a semester course designed for students who have an interest in how ecosystems work and how man's actions are changing them. Students are provided opportunities to explore how complex interactions between social institutions such as the government, religion, and the law connect with the functioning of ecosystems, as well as opportunities to examine the creation and implementation of laws governing the environment, and the investigation of important environmental events such as Earth Day, Love Canal, and Chernobyl. There is a focus on inquiry based lab activities and students are expected to propose solutions and project future outcomes. Students are also expected to work independently and to develop their personal agenda, which will allow them to "think globally and act locally."

Environmental Science Populations

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE Grades 11-12

AP Environmental Science is a full year course is designed for students who have an interest in environmental issues and solutions. Students are provided the opportunity to gain an understanding of current local and global environmental issues and to debate proposed solutions. An understanding of the interrelationships between all elements of ecosystems will be gained. Laboratory work allows students to explore and investigate the local environment and develop plans for improvement. Students work independently and in groups to learn about relevant components of environmental issues and develop proposed plans of action. The students develop a personal agenda by which they "think globally, act locally." Students who enroll in AP Environmental Science will be expected to complete additional assignments that will prepare them for the AP exam in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ASTRONOMY (ELECTIVE) Grades 11-12

Astronomy is a one-semester course designed for students who are interested in a systematic and scientific study of our solar system, galaxy, and universe. Students are required to attend a minimum number of nighttime observation meetings on and off-campus during the semester. Topics include celestial geometry, telescopes and observation techniques, light and

electromagnetic radiation, the planets of our solar system and their moons, the sun, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and the size of the universe, neutron stars and black holes, Humble expansion, and cosmological theories. Students who take this course should have strong algebra and trigonometry skills.

ASTRONOMY

FORENSIC SCIENCE (ELECTIVE) Grades 11–12

Forensic Science is a one-semester multidisciplinary laboratory course providing students an appreciation of how the scientific method and scientific concepts, experimentation, and careful data analysis are applied to real world situations, specifically forensic investigations. Topics of study include the history of forensic science, and major forensic disciplines such as fingerprinting, entomology, DNA analysis, serology, pathology, anthropology and trace elements. Students will also be challenged to deal with social science issues such as ethics and law. After learning the basics, students are asked to apply their knowledge to simulated crime scenes, real crime histories, and to participate in mock trials.

FORENSIC SCIENCE

History and Social Studies

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Social Studies

The Summit Public Schools shares the vision of the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Social Studies (re-adopted 2014) to provide all students with the information required to become informed and responsible citizens who are able to contribute to society. The standards provide a framework to foster in students the development of an understanding of the world as our shared home, and an appreciation of our American heritage. The objectives identified are attained through the achievement of student literacy in four major social studies disciplines: civics, history, economics and geography. While each discipline contributes its own unique perspective of the world as our home, it is their integration that produces a truly literate understanding of history and social studies.

In addition, the English language arts (ELA) Common Core Standards include supplemental guidelines for literacy in history and social studies. Teachers of history and social studies use their content area expertise to help students meet the particular requirements of reading, writing, speaking, listening, and using language effectively for college, career, and life readiness. Using primary and secondary sources, students are challenged and asked questions that push them to refer back to and to apply what they’ve read, emphasizing critical-thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills. Within our curriculum documents the standards are addressed at each grade level with increasing rigor and in greater depth.

Because every learner is an individual with specialized educational needs, the Summit Public Schools presents its rigorous curriculum through the application of differentiated instructional strategies. Direct and explicit instruction as well as the application of research-based instructional strategies, such as problem-based learning, cooperative learning techniques, teacher and peer modeling, and the regular implementation of formative authentic assessments are fostered.

In order to graduate from Summit High School, students must successfully complete three full-year history courses, including two years of United States History and one year of World History.

Mr. James Woods, Supervisor of History and Social Studies, 9-12

908-918-2100 x 5568

email

WORLD HISTORY Grade 9

World Histoy is a one-year survey course that traces the development and contributions of civilizations in different parts of the world. Primary emphasis is placed on cultures in Europe, the Far East, Africa, and the Americas. Beginning with a review of major political and cultural legacies of the classical and medieval worlds, time is then spent examining the major historical, scientific and cultural events in Europe from the Renaissance through the Industrial Revolution. Study continues with the achievements and contributions of China's Ming and Qing Dynasties, as well as the development of Japan's Tokugawa Shogunate. In addition, focus is placed on the impact of Western exploration and imperialism on non-Western civilizations in this era. The final units introduce students to the major global events of the 20th century and the post WW II era of globalization. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills that allow students to understand the past and apply those

skills to questions they will encounter in the future.

World History

GLOBAL STUDIES Grade 9

This one-year interdisciplinary Global Studies class is a double-period course that combines freshmen year English and world history. Global Studies creates an environment that encourages students to make connections between world literature and world history. This course will trace the development and contributions of civilizations in different parts of the world. Primary emphasis is placed on the history and literature of cultures in Europe, the Far East, Africa and the Americas. The course will begin with a review of the major political and cultural legacies of the classical and medieval worlds, and it will end with the major global events of the 20th century and the post W.W. II era of globalization. Students will examine themes and literature that address current political, social, and economic trends and events that influence today’s world. Emphasis is placed on the development of skills that allow students to understand the past and apply those skills to questions they will encounter in the future. A research project, as well as various types of narrative and expository essays, are expected.

U.S. HISTORY I SURVEY Grades 10

U.S. History I is required for all students and is usually taken in the sophomore year. This course presents a survey of our nation's history from early colonial times through industrialization. It aims to build in the student an understanding of the foundations of our government and the ideals on which the nation was constructed; an awareness of the problems that developed as the nation expanded; and an appreciation of the experiences and contributions of Americans in all walks of life. Students examine current American political, social, and economic trends in light of historical events. The role of citizens in a democracy is also investigated from both historical and contemporary perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the development of appropriate skills that allow students to understand the past and apply those skills to questions they will encounter in the future.

US History 1

U.S. HISTORY I HONORS Grade10

U.S. History I Honors is a full year course that prepares students in a two-year accelerated program to take the Advanced Placement American History examination at the end of their junior year. Reading and interpretative writing assignments are substantial with study of the history of the United States from early colonial times through industrialization, with special emphasis placed on the evolution of political, economic, social, and intellectual patterns of the 19th century as they influenced the nation's development. Students analyze the trends of historical interpretation dealing with this span of history through the use of primary sources, and examine current American political, social, and economic trends in light of historical events. The role of citizens in a democracy is also investigated from both historical and contemporary perspectives. Emphasis is placed on the development of appropriate skills that allow students to understand the past and apply those skills to questions they will encounter in the future. This course requires a summer reading assignment.

U.S. HISTORY II SURVEY Grade 11

U.S. Histoy II is required for all students and is usually taken in the junior year. This course continues the survey of United States history starting with the Progressive Era and concluding with the Obama Administration and an analysis of the future global role of the U.S. in the 21st century. The evolution of the United States from a 19th century agrarian society to its present-day, complex, post-industrial society is traced. Current affairs are analyzed in relationship to these developments. In addition, the course builds on the skills learned in World History and US I as students continue to analyze the American experience in both local and global terms. Historical and contemporary political, social, and economic issues are investigated as a means to develop skills that students can transfer to questions they may encounter in the future.

US History 2

U.S. HISTORY II HONORS Grade 11

U.S. Histoy II is required for all students and is usually taken in the junior year. Successful students in U.S. II Honors demonstrate a deep interest in the study of history at an advanced level, the ability to analyze and write effectively and the desire to participate actively in class discussions. A considerable amount of time is spent outside the classroom on reading and analyzing a variety of sources, both primary and secondary. This course continues the survey of United States history, starting with the Progressive Era and concluding with the Obama Administration and an analysis of the future global role of the U.S. in the 21st century. Emphasizing historical research and the analysis and interpretation of primary sources, the evolution of the United States from a 19th century agrarian society to its present-day postindustrial society is traced. In addition, the course builds on the skills learned in World History and U.S. I as students continue to analyze the American experience in both local and global terms. Historical and contemporary political, social, and economic issues are investigated as a means to develop skills that students can transfer to questions they may encounter in the future. This course requires a summer assignment.

US History 2 Honors

ADVANCED PLACEMENT U.S. HISTORY II Grade 11

AP U.S. History II continues the survey of United States history, starting with the Progressive Era and U.S. Imperialism at the turn of the century and concluding with the Obama Administration and an analysis of the future global role of the U.S. in the 21st century. Placing emphasis on historical research and the analysis and interpretation of primary sources, the evolution of the United States from a 19th century agrarian society to its present-day, complex, post-industrial society is traced. Students must devote a considerable amount of time to outside reading requirements and be able to participate actively in class discussion. This course requires a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare and take the AP exam in May.

AP US History 2

History and Social Studies Electives

ADVANCED PLACEMENT WORLD HISTORY Grade 12

AP World History is a full-year course examing the evolution of cross-cultural global contacts and analyze the way in which the world’s major civilizations have interacted since 8,000 B.C.E. The curriculum is built around five overarching themes which emphasize elements such as the interaction between humans and the environment, the interaction of cultures, state-building, competing economic systems and the transformation of social structures. These themes provide a framework to make comparisons over time and across cultures. Students must devote a considerable amount of time to outside reading in both texts and supplemental primary and secondary sources. This course requires a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP World History

ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS Grades 11

AP U.S. Government and Politics is a one-semester course designed to give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. Included is the study of the constitutional underpinnings used to interpret American politics with an analysis of specific examples. Students investigate how political beliefs, political parties, interest groups, mass media, and the institutions of the national government shape their political process. This course requires a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

EUROPEAN HISTORY Grades 11-12

European History is a full-year course designed to study the major trends of Western Civilization in politics, economics, and social/cultural history from the Renaissance to the present in Europe. The curriculum builds upon the understandings gained in the World History curriculum and provides students with an added opportunity to pursue interests in the history of science, art and philosophy, as well as the development of political science.

European History

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY Grade 12

AP European History is a full-year course that builds upon the World History curriculum and continues in-depth study from the Renaissance to the present in Europe. Students who demonstrate a high level of ability and a deep interest in history are provided added opportunities to pursue politics, economics, and social/cultural history and trends. Students are expected to devote considerable time to outside reading requirements and be able to participate actively in class discussions. This course requires a summer assignment. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to prepare for and take the AP exam in May.

AP European History

THE UNITED STATES IN INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS Grades 11-12

The U.S. in International Affairs is a on-semester course focused on global interactions and the role of the United States as a member of the international community. Topics such as world population and development, human rights, environmental concerns, international trade, American foreign policy, and security threats including nuclear proliferation and terrorism are studied. Students are exposed to the world and varying points of view on global issues through a variety of different international sources including print, film/video, websites etc. Considerable time is spent making sense of current world conflicts, challenges, and events.

International Affairs

FINANCIAL LITERACY and ECONOMICS Grades 10-11-12

Financial Literacy and Economics is a one-semester course that fulfills the Financial Literacy Graduation requirement and is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of financial literacy and economics. Students examine topics such as income and careers, money management, debt management, saving and investing, financial responsibility, and risk management and insurance. In addition the American economic system is examined as students learn the principles of supply and demand, free enterprise, the impact of Federal budget, foreign trade, taxes, unemployment, economic growth, and the current economic crisis. Aspects of business such as advertising (marketing), negotiating skills, and entrepreneurship are also studied to provide the student with a broad, well-rounded introduction to the importance of finance.

Financial Literacy and Economics

LAW Grades 11-12

Law is a one-semester course is designed for those students interested in an introduction to the law and its role in today's society. Students examine the individual's relationship with government. Selected court decisions are analyzed, and legal rights and obligations are emphasized in a practical way. While the focus is on the American legal system, global examples and connections are incorporated into the instruction. The course also assists students in developing the ability to defend both sides of a legal question, or argument orally and in writing.

Law

SOCIOLOGY Grades 11-12

Sociology is a one-semester course designed to expose students to the basic principles and concepts of group behavior. Students focus on culture, socialization, social change, group dynamics and social institutions using local, national and global examples. Equipped with an understanding of these principles and concepts, students explore contemporary social problems.

Sociology

FILM AND HISTORY IN SOCIETY Grades 11-12

Film and History in Society is a one-semester course examining the relationship between motion pictures and history. The class studies films that have influenced society and films that depict historical events. Students examine how films reflect the social and political environment of the time in which they are produced and research the use and role of film in history, as well as the accuracy/inaccuracy of historical films.

Film and History

Health and Physical Education

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Health and PE

(Re-adopted 2014)

Comprehensive Health and Physical Education is an integral component of 21st century education. As part of New Jersey’s initiative to prepare students to function optimally as global citizens and workers, health and physical education focuses on taking personal responsibility for one’s health through an active, healthy lifestyle that fosters a lifelong commitment to wellness, and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that influence healthy behaviors within the context of self, family, school, and the local and global community. As part of this vision, the NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards for Health and Physical Education provide a framework for Summit’s curriculum development, instruction, and assessment that emphasizes interdisciplinary connections and fosters a community that:

  • Maintains physical, social, and emotional health by practicing healthy behaviors and goal setting.
  • Engages in a physically active lifestyle.
  • Is knowledgeable about health and wellness and how to access health resources.
  • Recognizes the influence of media, technology, and culture in making informed health-related decisions as a consumer of health products and services.
  • Practices effective cross-cultural communication, problem solving, negotiation, and conflict resolution skills.
  • Is accepting and respectful of individual and cultural differences.
  • Advocates for personal, family, community, and global wellness and is knowledgeable about national and international public health and safety issues.

The standards topics for grades 9-12 include Wellness, Alcohol, Tobacco, and other Drugs, Family Life, and Community Health Skills during Health classes, and Wellness, Movement Education/ Rhythm, Cooperative Games, Individual Activities, and Team Activities during Physical Education classes.

All students in NJ in grades 1-12 are required to participate in a comprehensive, sequential, health and physical education program for at least 150 minutes per week each year. In high school, students must complete at least 3 credits in health and physical education for each year of attendance in order to receive a state-endorsed diploma.

Summit’s Health and PE program has been designed to provide learning opportunities for the physical and emotional development of individual students. Lessons are intended to motivate and educate students to protect, maintain, and improve their own health and that of others. As a department staff strive to meet the physical, mental, emotional and social needs of children through a wide variety of experiences, individual and group activities selected and conducted in accordance with the needs, interests, and maturity levels of the individual students and with the needs of the community at large.

The Physical Education curriculum is organized to include a planned progression of skills and activities. Units are sequenced to target essential skills and build upon these skills as each school year, and cumulative school years progress. Through participation in the program this progression encourages student development of fundamental skills, cardiovascular awareness and fitness, individual responsibility, self-discipline, strengthened peer relationships, and leadership qualities. The goal of our program is to provide activities where self-expression, self-confidence, and physical and mental poise can be attained through perseverance and the mastery of physical, mental, and social tasks.

Other benefits of our Health and Physical Education program include:

  • Opportunities to teach character traits such as sportsmanship, teamwork, cooperation, encouragement, kindness, responsibility, self-esteem, and respect for others,
  • Areas for students to excel beyond academics. Additionally, students who struggle in the classroom may find increased self-respect and a new sense of admiration from their classmates for their competence in PE.
  • Physically and mentally healthy students are more likely to be prepared to meet daily challenges, and are more likely to make appropriate choices about lifestyles.
  • Long-term health and wellness is promoted by making health and fitness fun, and by incorporating lessons on the importance of movement for overall health and disease prevention.
  • Increased standardized test scores, (http://www.sparkpe.org/resultsSallis.pdf)
  • Improved and reinforced learning across the curriculum,
  • The involvement of every student, with each student instructed at his or her level of ability.
  • Encouragement for students to increase their knowledge of health and wellness and how it affects their lives.
  • Providing students with the foundation to maintain their physical, social, and emotional health.

    Mr. Michael Sandor, Supervisor of Health and Physical Education, PK-12908-918-2100 x 5633 emailPhysical Education - Grade 9Grade 10Grade 11Grade 12Health Education - Grade 9 Life Cycle - Birth to DeathGrade 10 Driver Education TheoryGrade 11 First Aid and CPRGrade 12 Healthy Lifestyles

Fine, Practical and Performing Arts

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for World Languages

(Re-adopted 2014)

In order to learn about the National Standards for World Language Education, "The Five C's" (Communication, Cultures,Comparisons, Communities, Connections), click on the link: National Standards Goals

The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) revised its proficiency guidelines for speaking, listening, reading, and writing in 2012. The guidelines describe the tasks that students can accomplish at each of the 5 major levels of proficiency. The five levels are: Distinguished, Superior, Advanced, Intermediate, and Novice. For more information, click on the link: ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines

The study of languages is an integral part of every student's academic preparation. The Summit High School world language program is comprised of Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, and Latin. Students are required by the State of New Jersey to successfully complete one year of high school world language study for graduation. Students in Summit have the opportunity to study Spanish from elementary school through their senior year, study French, Mandarin, and Latin from grade 6 through their senior year, and/or to choose a second world language in high school. Students are encouraged to further their knowledge and use of their respective languages beyond the classroom through extra-curricular clubs and cultural activities offered throughout the school year. Additionally, students are supported as they prepare to participate in local, state, and national language competitions and exams.

The primary goal of world language study is communications proficiency. In addition to enhancing understanding of English and connecting other disciplines to the world language course of study, students learn to communicate through practice and presentation in all four skill areas including reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Course content is presented thematically, with the newest curricula written using the Problem-Based Learning model, linking learning outcomes to dealing with real-life issues and situations. Units of study may include vocabulary, grammar, conversation, reading passages, writing samples, listening activities authentic media, and videos all designed to develop students’ ability to use language authentically. The cultures of the countries where the world languages are spoken are also studied through readings, authentic media, videos, and class discussions. Students begin the year with a baseline assessment and use portfolios to reflect on their progress in developing language skills and strengthening cultural awareness. All world language students are expected to use the target language to present information, interpret authentic materials in meaningful contexts, and to communicate with each other, as well as with native / heritage speakers. All students are expected to use language to connect to other communities and to view cultures from different perspectives.

Summit’s world language curriculum is aligned to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and to the National Standards for World Language Education, as well as, with the proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL). The program provides students essential knowledge and skills to be informed, contributing members of the global society.

There are many good reasons to study world languages. According to the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C., students who study even one year of foreign languages:

• Score up to 250 points higher on SATs

• Perform better on measures of verbal and non-verbal intelligence than their monolingual peers

• Develop greater cultural flexibility and sensitivity towards others

• Have larger vocabularies

• Have higher developed listening and retention skills

• Perform better on tests of reading and math

• Are more creative

• Display more highly developed thinking skills

• Possess skills critical to the national defense

• Possess skills critical to the national economy

• Are better able to compete in a global economy

World language study also:

• Gives students a competitive edge in college admissions

• Has a positive overall effect on mental development and intellectual growth

• Improves understanding of one's native tongue

• Gives a student the ability to communicate with people he/she would otherwise not have the chance to know

• Allows students the opportunity to study in another country and immerse in the culture

• Enhances employment opportunities - not only can one do a better job at conducting international business, the travel

and work become easier and more enjoyable

Language and communication are at the heart of the human experience.

The United States must educate students who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in a pluralistic American society and abroad. This imperative envisions a future in which ALL students will develop and maintain proficiency in English and at least one other language, modern or classical. Children who come to school from non-English backgrounds should also have opportunities to develop further proficiencies in their first language.

~Statement of Philosophy from The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

Ms. Ana Ventoso, Supervisor of World Language, English as a Second Language,

and Bilingual Education, PK-12

908-918-2100 X 5531

aventoso@fc.summit.k12.nj.us

FRENCH 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 1 is a full-year course that focuses on student development of communicative proficiencies and cultural

understanding. The objective of this course is for students to use French appropriately inmculturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides interesting and real-life opportunities for students to practice the skills necessary to develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.

FRENCH 1

FRENCH 2 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 2 is a full-year course designed to expand student communication skills, develop control of grammar and

vocabulary, and to develop cultural understandings through Internet and other authentic experiences. Thematic units build upon the students’ first-year experiences and cultural understandings. Students use the language for real tasks, read fiction and non-fiction selections, view Internet clips to increase comprehension, discuss daily life, and begin to extend their control of the language in guided compositions.

French 2

FRENCH 3 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 3 is a full-year course designed to continue to develop student control of the language and to extend cultural

understandings of Francophone cultures. Students improve spoken and written expression as they read, view, and discuss fiction and non-fiction selections from the French-speaking world. Problem-based learning experiences using the Internet, other authentic resources, and technology resources provide opportunities for real-time communication. Student work advances from guided to free expression in both spoken and written activities.

FRENCH 4 Grades 10-11-12

French 4 is a full-year course with units of study designed to increase student linguistic proficiencies and cultural understanding through exploration and discussion of issues using culturally authentic resources, including interfacing with students of Montpellier, France. Problem-Based Learning units support interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative skills and the reading of increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction texts. The number and length of student compositions increase, as does the use of sophisticated structures.

FRENCH 4

FRENCH 5 Honors Grades 10-11-12

French 5 Honors is a full-year course emphasizing communicative proficiency and based on the Problem-Based Learning Model. Students are expected to integrate the variety of skills built throughout the preceding levels of French and use their language skills to communicate about real-world issues. Students read, discuss, and write about literary and current fiction and non-fiction texts by French-speaking authors. Students respond to authentic materials available in print, online, and in video. Students compare and contrast perspectives on these issues with students in Montpellier, France.

Being revised summer 2014

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH 6 Grades 11-12

AP French 6 fis a full-year course focusing on large issues such as immigration and unemployment, effects of pollution, today’s family structure, control of information, as well as French and American education models. Students are expected to integrate a wider vocabulary, more sophisticated use ofgrammar, and knowledge of French-speaking cultures to discuss these issues. Students read a wide spectrum of literature, non-fiction text, and current news sources, view Internet clips and

television programs, listen to music and news, and use all these authentic resources as vehicles for conversation with an emphasis on critical thinking. Preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in French Language focuses on fluency in French for career enhancement and global understanding. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH 6

LATIN 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Latin 1 is a full-year course that introduces classroom vocabulary, elementary Latin grammar, and vocabulary to enable the student to participate in the target language in class, to read easy selections concerning Roman life, culture, history, and mythology, some writing of simple Latin. The class emphasizes classical contributions and connections to modern life.

Latin

LATIN 2 Grades 9-10-11-12

Latin 2 is a full-year course that continues student development of basic Latin grammar and vocabulary with readings

of graduated difficulty on Roman life and mythology. Students continue to develop speaking skills and guided writing enhances student understanding of Latin constructions.

LATIN 3 Grades 9-10-11-12

Latin 3 is a full-year intermediate course that broadens the student's knowledge of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students gain increased facility with the language from reading selections about Roman life, mythology, and civilization and responding to the readings with appropriate writing. Discussion of the text includes the development of cultural and linguistic understanding.

LATIN 4 Grades 10-11-12

Latin 4 is a full-year translation course with readings of Pliny, Ovid, Plautus, Cicero, Eutropius, and Lucretius. Emphasis is placed upon strengthening the grasp of advanced Latin grammar and vocabulary, as well as extending this knowledge to include more complex forms and concepts. Films, recordings, and non-book materials are used. Literary criticism and English vocabulary comprehension development are stressed.

LATIN/LITERATURE HONORS Grades 11–12

Latin/Literature Honors is a full-year course requiring students to read both prose and verse of classical authors including Ovid, Livy, Petronius and Catullus with the objective of cultivating an appreciation for poetry, and an understanding of the literature. Students focus on the historical background of the poets' era and the influence of history on the literature, while developing an advanced understanding of literary devices and Latin grammar.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LATIN Grades 11-12

AP Latin is a full-year course requiring students to read Caesar with the objective of exploring in detail two Classical texts to understand their meaning, historical importance, cultural background, effect on modern literature, and their poetic/prose styles. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.

MANDARIN CHINESE 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Mandarin Chinese 1 is full-year course focusing on student development of communicative proficiencies, Pinyin use, character writing and decoding, and cultural understanding with the objective of students using Mandarin appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides interesting and real-life opportunities to practice the skills necessary to

develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.

MANDARIN CHINESE 2 Grades 10-11-12

Mandarin Chinese 2 is a full-year course continuing the focus of Mandarin Chinese 1 on developing communicative skills. Speaking proficiency, use of Pinyin, character writing and reading skills, as well as developing an understanding of the Chinese-speaking cultures through Internet resources and other classroom experiences. Proficiency skills and cultural understandings are taught in the context of authentic thematic units.

Mandarin Chinese 2

MANDARIN CHINESE 3 Grades 11-12

Mandarin Chinese 3 is a full-year course designed to improve student communication skills, develop student’s control of grammar and vocabulary, and to extend cultural understandings. Tasks encourage student growth in character writing, interpretation of authentic materials and resources, and communication in real life situations. The Internet, technology resources, and auxiliary materials support thematic learning. Communicative opportunities are extended with experiences both within and beyond the classroom.

Mandarin Chinese 3

MANDARIN CHINESE 4 Grades 11-12

Mandarin Chinese 4 is a full-year course designed to increase student’s linguistic skills and to explore cultural understandings through discussions and the development of wider perspectives based on fiction and non-fiction readings, Internet resources, community resources, and other culturally authentic sources. Experiences beyond the classroom support communicative skill development.

Mandarin Chinese 4

MANDARIN CHINESE 5 HONORS Grades 11-12

Mandarin Chinese 5 honors is a full-year course requiring students to interact with engaging issues and current information as they refine language proficiency, cultural understanding, and critical thinking using Problem-Based Learning methodology. Emphasis is placed on communicative proficiency. Culturally authentic resources (Internet, news, videos, etc.) are used to support learning. Students explore multiple perspectives on these issues and topics with Chinese-speaking students, community members, and e-friends.

Mandarin Chinese 5

SPANISH 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Spanish 1 is a full-year course focusing on student development of communicative proficiencies and cultural

understanding with the objective of students using Spanish appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides engaging, real-life opportunities to practice the skills necessary to develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.

SPANISH 2 Grades 9-10-11-12

Spanish 2 is a full-year course designed to expand student communication skills, develop control of grammar and vocabulary, increase comprehension, and develop cultural understandings through reading fiction and non-fiction selections, Internet and other authentic tasks and experiences. Students begin to extend their control of the language in guided compositions. Thematic units build upon the students’ first-year experiences and cultural understandings.

Spanish 2

SPANISH 3 Grades 9-10-11-12

Spanish 3 is a full-year course designed to continue to develop student control of the language and to extend the understanding of Spanish cultures. Spoken and written expression is improved by reading, viewing, and discussing fiction and non-fiction selections from the Spanish-speaking world. Problem-based learning experiences using the Internet, other authentic resources, and technology resources provide opportunities for real-time communication. Student work product advances from guided to free expression in both spoken and written activities.

Spanish 3

SPANISH 4 Grades 10-11-12

Spanish 4 is a full-year course with Problem-Based units of study designed to increase critical thinking skills, as well as student linguistic proficiencies, and cultural understanding through exploration and discussion of issues. The use of culturally authentic resources, including interfacing with Summit’s diverse community is a focus. Interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative proficiency is emphasized, and students read increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction text. The number and length of student compositions increase, as does the use of sophisticated structures.

Spanish 4

SPANISH 5 Honors Grades 11-12

Spanish 5 Honors is a full-year course designed to enable students to interact with enaging issues and current topics as language and communicative proficiency, cultural understanding, and critical thinking skills are refined. Problem-Based Learning topics include cultural identity, immigration, meeting the challenges of environmental change, and role models and heroes. Students use culturally authentic resources (Internet, news, videos, etc.) to support their learning and explore multiple perspectives on issues and topics with Spanish-speaking students, community members and e-friends.

SPANISH 5 Honors

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH 6 Grades 11-12

AP Spanish 6 is a full-year course where students engage with issues at an advanced level including historical and cultural causes and outcomes of immigration and emigration, personal, literary, and cultural duality, gender in Spanish literature, culture and media, and current trends in culture, politics, and policies within, and outside of the United States. Students are expected to integrate a wider vocabulary, sophisticated use of grammar, and knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures to discuss these issues. Students read a wide spectrum of literature, non-fiction text, and current news sources, view Internet clips and television programs, listen to music and news, and use these authentic resources as vehicles for conversation and critical thinking. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.

SPANISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE - HONORS Grades 11-12

Spanish Literature and Culture Honors is a full-year course designed to mirror the framework of skills and objectives outlined for the Advanced Placement Examination of Spanish Literature and Culture. Students are exposured to a variety of literary texts from across the Spanish-speaking World, including a sampling of Peninsular Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Hispanic literature. The course is reflective of an introductory college literature course in which students are encouraged to explore linguistic and cultural comparisons. The goal of this course is to provide more opportunities to extend Spanish language proficiency skills through critical reading and analytical writing and enhance opportunities to continue to develop proficiencies in all three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational), while addressing all five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language

Learning in the 21st Century. All students will have the option to take the AP exam in May, but are not required to do so.

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for the Arts

(Re-adopted 2014)

The Summit public schools provide an enriched arts experience for all levels of education that is aligned to the standards. The NJ Core Curriculum Content Standards for the Arts includes dance, music, theatre, and visual art, while the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for 21st-Century Life and Careers Standards engage students in the process of career preparation by participating in structured learning experiences, specialized programs, and advanced courses that reflect personal aptitudes and career interests. Combined, the study of fine, performing and practical arts in the curriculum enables students to develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills, organizational, planning, goal setting, research, idea formation, and observational skills, while also nurturing creativity and innovation. Through the arts, behaviors of sustained engagement, self-discipline, and persistence are developed that can then be applied to any subject and any aspect of life.

Artistic experiences are provided at all grade levels and at all levels of artistic ability to develop the creative potential in each child and to allow for maximum individual differences in expression and growth. Summit’s arts program teaches visual literacy and this education is a powerful influence in making students more discriminating and more sensitive to the things they see, use, and create. The buildings in which we live and work, the objects we use in daily life, our fashions and entertainment all depend on art. Art helps students make informed, conscious aesthetic judgments and decisions. Additionally, arts education is vital to the development of citizens in our society because it is one of the primary forms of communication. Through the arts, students also learn tolerance, respect, attitudes, and values of people of other cultures. Arts education fosters in students the capacity to appreciate diversity, sensitizes students to the feelings of others, and helps students to understand individual differences.

The Fine, Performing, and Practical Arts curriculum is designed to provide relevant, authentic, experiential learning opportunities that enable students to:

  • apply both imagination and rational thinking to the making of art;
  • understand the value of reflection and critical judgment in creative work;
  • present and perform art publicly, with confidence, pride, and distinction;
  • use artistic literacy as a natural enhancement to learning other subjects;
  • understand how world cultures have been historically influenced and shaped by the arts;
  • Engage in collaboration, teamwork, and leadership;
  • Develop media and technological fluency and literacy;
  • Successfully participate in post-secondary education and careers.

The Board of Education has set a goal to make Summit the leader in STEAM education by 2018. STEAM--Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts (design) and Mathematics--is an integrated way to deliver curriculum and instruction offering problem-based authentic opportunities for learning. This approach is reflected in many courses across the curriculum.

Mr. Thomas Maliszewski, Supervisor of Fine, Performing and Practical Arts, PK-12 908-918-2100 X 5556 email

Fine Arts

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Computer and Engineering Graphics 1 is a one semester hands-on computer, art, and engineering course utilizing technology and designed to provide skills in both the freehand and mechanical graphics methods which are used commonly in the fine and graphic arts. This course includes specific training with intermediate and professional-level graphics applications such as study in color theory/applications, digital photography, animation and audio/visual presentations. Students successfully completing this course will be able to integrate graphics, design and engineering into sophisticated presentations utilizing popular computer applications.

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 1

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 2 Grades 10-11-12

Computer and Engineering Graphics 2 is a one semester course that continues the skills learned in the previous Computer

Graphics course. Also a hands-on computer, art, and engineering course utilizing technology and designed to provide skills in both the freehand and mechanical graphics methods which are used commonly in the fine and graphic arts, this course includes specific training with intermediate and professional-level graphics applications such as study in design elements, prototyping, industrial design, and engineering. Students successfully completing this course will be able to integrate graphics, design and engineering into sophisticated presentations utilizing popular computer applications.

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 2

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 3 Grades 10-11-12

Computer and Engineering Graphics 3 is a one semester course that continues the skills learned in the previous two Computer

Graphics courses. Also a hands-on computer, art, and engineering course utilizing technology and designed to provide skills in both the freehand and mechanical graphics methods which are used commonly in the fine and graphic arts, this course includes specific training with intermediate and professional-level graphics applications and deeper study in design elements, prototyping, industrial design, and engineering. Students successfully completing this course will be able to integrate graphics, design and engineering into sophisticated presentations utilizing popular computer applications.

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 3

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 4 Grades 11-12

Computer and Engineering Graphics 4 is a one semester course that continues the skills learned in the previous three Computer Graphics courses. Also a hands-on computer, art, and engineering course utilizing technology and designed to provide skills in both the freehand and mechanical graphics methods which are used commonly in the fine and graphic arts, this course includes specific training with intermediate and professional-level graphics applications and in-depth study of design elements, prototyping, industrial design, and engineering. Students successfully completing this course will be able to integrate graphics, design and engineering into sophisticated presentations utilizing popular computer applications.

COMPUTER AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS 4

GRAPHICS AND ENGINEERING BY DESIGN ONLINE Grades 11-12

Graphics and Engineering by Design is a one semester online course extension of all Technology Education classes. This course focuses on STEAM based projects with students creating working models using Design and CAD software. Topics of study include the design process, identifying areas of technology, design through discovery, 3D modeling, prototyping, and inventing. Students in this course are challenged to innovate and invent solutions to problems that occur in their daily life.

This is an online course requiring students to complete activities on their own time each week. In addition, students meet with the instructor 1-2 times per month before and after school to work on their physical models, attend monthly meetings, and are required to present their projects. Students need to have access to the Internet and computer programs including Photoshop and Illustrator off site of the school. Individual student needs are accomodated.

GRAPHICS AND ENGINEERING BY DESIGN ONLINE

STUDIO ART Grades 9-10-11-12

Studio Art is a one-semester abbreviated version of Art 1. This hands-on course utilizes a wide variety of materials, equipment, and tools and is designed to expose students to the practices, forms, histories, philosophies, processes, media, and techniques utilized in two- and three-dimensional art. Topics are taught in theory and practice and include the investigation of the formal elements of design, such as, line, form, texture, composition and color, graduated and sequential processes with attention directed to quality and craftsmanship, and a demonstration of the understanding of the inter-relatedness among these elements and other academic disciplines. Mediums and medias may include any or all of drawing, painting, mixed media, collage, printmaking, clay, inks, wood, computers, photographs, and found objects.

STUDIO ART

SCULPTURE/CERAMICS Grades 10-11-12

Sculpture/ceramics is a one-semester or full year studio course providing students with an in-depth investigation of various sculpture media and ceramic techniques. The experience may include, but is not limited to woodwork, mold making, using the potters’ wheel, stoneware constructions, ceramic glaze and stain formulation and application, and the recontextualizing of found objects. All projects will be prepared for display upon completion.

SCULPTURE/CERAMICS

DRAWING and PAINTING Grades 10-11-12

Drawing and Painting is a one-semester or full-year course designed for students who are seeking an in-depth experience in contemporary drawing and painting media. The class will include, but is not limited to drawing techniques in graphite, charcoal, pastel, ink, water media, acrylics and nontraditional pigments. Painting instruction includes canvas preparation, use of hair and airbrushes, glazing techniques, establishing color schemes and color chemistry. Subject matter may range from still life to portraiture, with approaches from photo-realism to abstraction. Critiques and discussion examine student work in reference to the history of art and its relationship to drawing and painting. All projects will be prepared for display upon completion.

DRAWING and PAINTING

ART 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Art 1 is a full-year hands-on course utilizing a wide-variety of materials, equipment and tools. Although similar in content to Studio Art, a one-semester course, Art 1 differs by its emphasis on the in-depth exploration of materials and problems. In this course students will investigate the formal elements of design, including line, form, texture, composition and color, graduated and sequential processes with attentiondirected to quality and craftsmanship, and a demonstration of the understanding of the inter-relatedness of these elements. Mediums and media may include any and all of drawing, painting, mixed media,

collage, printmaking, clay, wood, computers, photographs, and found objects. Long-term projects that require substantial effort and commitment are an expectation for this course.

ART 1

ART 2 Grades 10-11-12

Art 2 is a full-year course that begins with a review of the formal elements of design t discussed in Art 1/Studio

Art. Projects focus on creativity and an in-depth exploration of a wide range of different mediums including any and all of drawing, painting, mixed media, collage, printmaking, clay, wood, computers, photographs, and found objects. There are both qualitative and quantitative expectations in the areas of two and three-dimensional work. Additionally, career and portfolio development is examined.

ART 2

ART 3 Grades 11-12

Art 3 is a full-year studio course providing students with choices in various mediums including, but not limited to painting, sculpture, silkscreen and relief cut printmaking, woods, computer graphics, and color chemistry. Students will pursue in-depth study in a particular medium or concept, and works of art produced will be displayed in local and regional exhibitions.

ART 3

ART 4 Grade 12

Art 4 is a full-year, senior-level course in the studio arts that builds on the fundamentals studied in Art 3.

Students are provided choices in various mediums including, but not limited to painting, sculpture, ceramics (utilitarian and as sculpture), silkscreen and relief printing processes, and computer graphics. Students will pursue in-depth study in a particular medium or concept, and works of art produced will be displayed in local and regional exhibitions.

ART 4

PHOTOGRAPHY 1 Grades 10-11-12

Photography 1 is a one-semester course designed for students with little or no experience in photography who want to

explore camera functions, film exposure and development, printmaking, equipment, and artistic concepts. Topics are introduced through a series of demonstrations and assignments.

PHOTOGRAPHY 1

PHOTOGRAPHY 2 Grades 11-12

Photography 2 is a one-semester or full-year continuation of Photography 1 designed to teach advanced camera control, experimental film development and exposure methods, and advanced printing techniques. In addition to these applications the course includes opportunities to explore collage imaging and computer techniques. Shooting assignments are diverse and involve long and short-range projects.

PHOTOGRAPHY 2

ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY Grade 12

Advanced Photography is designed for students who have successfully completed Photography 1 and 2 and

are interested in pursuing a serious in-depth experience in photographic imaging including the opportunity to develop their AP portfolio. Demonstrations and discussions focus on precise film exposure and processing, advanced printing, mounting and finishing studio portrait photography, and adventures in collage and digital imaging. Assignments explore a wide variety of viewpoints and subject matter.

THE MOVING IMAGE 1 Grades 10-11-12

The Moving Image is a one-semester introduction to video and technical production techniques focusing on pre and post-production, layout, design, writing, and distribution of digital video and some HD format productions. Work produced in this course is displayed on the district television station.

The Moving Image 1

THE MOVING IMAGE 2 Grades 10-11-12

The Moving Image 2 is a one-semester or full-year course that continues the production and editing of digital video projects. Elements of camera work, lighting, design, writing and post-production recording are stressed. Assignments consist of creative productions in video format. Work produced in this course is displayed on the district television station.

The Moving Image 2

BROADCAST MEDIA Grades 10-11-12

Broadcast Media is a one-semester or full-year course for students with a variety of talents and interests in creating media for television and the Internet. Students work independently on their own projects and collaboratively to produce original media, and will also study films, TV and online content. Each student learns all the roles associated with broadcast production, but will specialize in certain aspects resulting in the production of a regularly scheduled program that will be broadcast on TV and on the web.

Broadcast Media

Practical (Family and Consumer Sciences) Education

FOODS AND NUTRITION Grades 9-10-11-12

Foods and Nutrition is a one-semester course that allows students to learn to prepare a variety of recipes related to basic food preparation of a variety of foods. Highlights include, basic baking, basic bread baking, pastas, and stir-fries. Nutritional needs, consumer considerations, table setting, manners, safety, career opportunities, and an understanding of the scientific principles used in food preparation and sanitation is emphasized. Students also use the computer for dietary analysis and recipe research.

FOODS AND NUTRITION 2 Grades 10-11-12

Foods and Nutrition 2 is a one-semester course providing opportunities for students to pursue more advanced cooking techniques, foreign foods choices, and entertainment menus. Information concerning safety, sanitation, nutrition, and food preparation is reviewed. Utilizing a variety of resources and references, students participate in planning and implementing individualized projects. Topics may include international cuisine, entertaining and party planning, small appliance research, individually selected demonstrations, and written restaurant reviews.

FOODS AND NUTRITION 3 Grades 10-11-12

Foods and Nutrition 3 is a one-semester advanced food preparation course. Class time is divided between the foods lab and the computer lab where students may research and design nutrition and menus. Fundamentals of mass food production, working with food in front of an audience, and techniques to enhance the ability to prepare a variety of attractive and delicious menus are explored.

CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Grades 9-10-11-12

Child Growth and Development is a one-semester course focusing on human development from before birth through the age of five. Students study pre-natal development, pregnancy, childbirth, infant care, growth, behavior, and developmental patterns of early childhood. Parenting, discipline versus punishment, and play are also covered. The course is designed to help students better understand the phenomena of birth and the development of children, and provides valuable career readiness information for working with young children.

INTERIOR DESIGN Grades 9-10-11-12

Interior Design is a one-semester course introducing the basic concepts of interior design including how the elements and principles of design are used to create pleasing environments. Design process steps, a variety of activities to provide insight into making educated buying and decorating decisions, career opportunities, and the expertise of guest speakers is explored.

FASHION DESIGN 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Fashion Design 1 is a one-semester course focusing on the design and construction foundations of fashion. Students examine the elements and principles of design, draw basic fashion figures in appropriate proportions, become more familiar with a variety of fabrics and their properties, and learn about the history of the textile industry. Additionally, students will apply their knowledge constructing garments in fabric, and learn how to operate a sewing machine as well as execute a variety of hand stitches. Careers in fashion are also explored.

FASHION DESIGN 1

FASHION DESIGN 2 Grades 10-11-12

Fashion Design 2 is a one-semester course designed for students who have successfully completed Fashion

Design I and would like to experience creating and constructing their own design. In addition to design and construction, students learn how to choose fabric, use computer design software, develop a marketing plan, and learn how to start and maintain a wardrobe that will maximize their clothing allowance. Field trips and guest speakers expose students to career choices in the fashion industry.

FASHION DESIGN 2

Performing Arts

CONCERT BAND Grades 9-10-11-12

Concert Band is a full-year course offering student musicians challenging opportunities to develop many aspects of performance including intonation, a variety of dynamics and articulation, rhythmic precision, nuance of phrasing, technical control, flexibility in following a conductor, posture, and stage decorum. During the concert season a wide range of music is explored. This course requires a bi-weekly, small-group pullout lesson. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

CONCERT BAND

WIND ENSEMBLE Grades 10-11-12

Wind ensemble is a full-year course offering advanced student musicians challenging opportunities to develop many aspects of performance. The music performed at an advanced high school/college level. The students electing for wind ensemble must pass a competitive audition and/or be recommended by the director of music. Students selected will be expected to practice and study over and above what is normally required for band. Preparing for music master recitals and/or regional auditions is strongly encouraged. Also required is a bi-weekly, small group pullout lesson. Attendance at all school concerts, graduation, and CJMEA band festival is required.

WIND ENSEMBLE

TREBLE CHORUS Grades 9-10-11-12

Treble Chorus is a full-year course in which students learn the foundations of musicianship, theory and vocal technique through a variety of literature. This class will help treble students learn the basics of vocal production, through breathing, posture, phonation, and diction with emphasis on the particulars of the treble voice. Much time is spent developing the total musicianship for each student through basic music theory and sight singing. The music performed is at a traditional high school women’s chorus level. Treble Chorus students also constitute a chief resource for the spring musical. For students who wish to excel, auditions for activities such as Chamber Choir, Regional, All-State, and ACDA honor choirs will be available. Also required is a bi-weekly, small-group pull out lesson. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

TREBLE CHORUS

CONCERT CHOIR Grades 9-10-11-12

Concert Choir is a full-year course in which students learn musicianship, theory, and vocal technique through a variety of choral literature. Students learn the basics of proper vocal production through breathing, posture, phonation, and diction. The music performed is at an advanced high school level, in the context of a mixed voice (male and female) setting. Much time is spent developing total musicianship for each student through music theory and sight singing. Concert Choir students also constitute a chief resource for the spring musical. For students who wish to excel, auditions for activities such as Chamber Choir, Regional, All-State, and ACDA honor choirs will be available. Also required is a bi-weekly, small-group pullout lesson. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

CONCERT CHOIR

STRING ORCHESTRA Grades 9-10-11-12

String Orchestra is a full-year course offering string musicians challenging opportunities to develop many aspects of performance, and it gives players experience in studying and performing a wide variety of music. Advanced techniques are practiced in every rehearsal. Prominent among these elements are intonation, articulation, rhythmic precision, dynamic variety, bowing techniques, balance among sections, flexibility in following a conductor, and nuance of phrasing. The most proficient wind and percussion players from wind ensemble are selected to combine with the string orchestra to form the Summit High School Symphony Orchestra. More advanced string students are encouraged to audition for the SHS Chamber Orchestra, which meets weekly in the evening. The most advanced students will form the Hilltop String Quartet. Preparing for music master recitals and region/All State auditions is strongly encouraged. There is a required bi-weekly pullout program. Attendance at all concerts is required.

Strings

MUSIC THEORY/ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY Grades 11-12

Music Theory/AP Music Theory is a full-year course giving student musicians the opportunity to understand the fundamental concepts of how music is constructed. Traditional performance-based ensembles (band, chorus, and

orchestra) do not have the time to study the complex underlying relationships found within music. This course provides the time. The major emphasis is focused on harmony and how it has changed through the centuries. Through classroom lecture, active listening, student composition, and guided practice, students gain an insight into the building blocks of music.

MUSIC THEORY

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY

INTRO TO THEATRE Grades 9-10-11-12

Intro to Theatre is a one-semester course that serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of acting and play production and offers exposure to a variety of dramatic texts. The major emphasis in the classroom is the introduction of basic acting techniques, theatre criticism, improvisation, stage diction, and movement. Students build the specific skills used in developing characterization and analyzing scenes. Student actors employ these skills in improvisational exercises and scene work. A general overview of other facets of theatre including technical, design, and theatre history, as well as the opportunity to participate in various workshops, master classes, and theatre field trips is also provided. Participation on some level, either as cast or crew member, in school productions is required.

THEATRE 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Theater 1 is a full-year course that serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of acting on stage and on film. Students are exposed to play production, stage terminology, and a variety of dramatic texts, and explore a variety of acting techniques that will assist them in recreating human behavior for the performance of any role on the stage or on the screen. The major emphasis in the classroom is the introduction of basic acting techniques, stage diction and movement. Students build specific skills used in developing characterization and analyzing scenes through improvisational exercises and scene work. A general overview of other facets of theatre including technical, design, directing, audition techniques, and musical theatre, as well as the opportunity to work in the SHS television studio filming their work for critique and for production on the SHS television channel are provided. Students also have the opportunity to participate in various workshops, master classes, and theatre field trips. Participation on some level, either as a cast or crew member, in the school productions is required.

ADVANCED THEATRE Grades 10-11-12

Advanced Theatre is a full-year course that builds on the skills gained in the first theater course and continues with more intense acting, forensic interpretation performance, audition, directing, film acting, and technical theatre skills and projects. Studies include an in-depth study of various acting techniques, classical acting styles and acting for film. The acting student works in the SHS television studio filming their work for critique and for production on the SHS television channel. Students participate in various professional workshops, audition master classes, and theatre field trips. The course culminates in a student-directed and produced Director’s Showcase. Participation on some level, either as a cast or crewmember, in the school

Practical (Family and Consumer Sciences) Education


FOODS AND NUTRITION Grades 9-10-11-12

Foods and Nutrition is a one-semester course that allows students to learn to prepare a variety of recipes related to basic food preparation of a variety of foods. Highlights include, basic baking, basic bread baking, pastas, and stir-fries. Nutritional needs, consumer considerations, table setting, manners, safety, career opportunities, and an understanding of the scientific principles used in food preparation and sanitation is emphasized. Students also use the computer for dietary analysis and recipe research.


FOODS AND NUTRITION 2 Grades 10-11-12

Foods and Nutrition 2 is a one-semester course providing opportunities for students to pursue more advanced cooking

techniques, foreign foods choices, and entertainment menus. Information concerning safety, sanitation, nutrition, and food preparation is reviewed. Utilizing a variety of resources and references, students participate in planning and implementing individualized projects. Topics may include international cuisine, entertaining and party planning, small appliance research, individually selected demonstrations, and written restaurant reviews.


FOODS AND NUTRITION 3 Grades 10-11-12

Foods and Nutrition 3 is a one-semester advanced food preparation course. Class time is divided between the foods lab and the computer lab where students may research and design nutrition and menus. Fundamentals of mass food production, working with food in front of an audience, and techniques to enhance the ability to prepare a variety of attractive and delicious menus are explored.


CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT Grades 9-10-11-12

Child Growth and Development is a one-semester course focusing on human development from before birth through the age of five. Students study pre-natal development, pregnancy, childbirth, infant care, growth, behavior, and developmental patterns of early childhood. Parenting, discipline versus punishment, and play are also covered. The course is designed to help students better understand the phenomena of birth and the development of children, and provides valuable career readiness information for working with young children.

INTERIOR DESIGN Grades 9-10-11-12

Interior Design is a one-semester course introducing the basic concepts of interior design including how the elements and principles of design are used to create pleasing environments. Design process steps, a variety of activities to provide insight into making educated buying and decorating decisions, career opportunities, and the expertise of guest speakers is explored.


FASHION DESIGN 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Fashion Design 1 is a one-semester course focusing on the design and construction foundations of fashion. Students examine the elements and principles of design, draw basic fashion figures in appropriate proportions, become more familiar with a variety of fabrics and their properties, and learn about the history of the textile industry. Additionally, students will apply their knowledge constructing garments in fabric, and learn how to operate a sewing machine as well as execute a variety of hand stitches. Careers in fashion are also explored.

FASHION DESIGN 1


FASHION DESIGN 2 Grades 10-11-12

Fashion Design 2 is a one-semester course designed for students who have successfully completed Fashion

Design I and would like to experience creating and constructing their own design. In addition to design and construction, students learn how to choose fabric, use computer design software, develop a marketing plan, and learn how to start and maintain a wardrobe that will maximize their clothing allowance. Field trips and guest speakers expose students to career choices in the fashion industry.

FASHION DESIGN 2


Performing Arts


CONCERT BAND Grades 9-10-11-12

Concert Band is a full-year course offering student musicians challenging opportunities to develop many aspects of performance including intonation, a variety of dynamics and articulation, rhythmic precision, nuance of phrasing, technical control, flexibility in following a conductor, posture, and stage decorum. During the concert season a wide range of music is explored. This course requires a bi-weekly, small-group pullout lesson. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

CONCERT BAND


WIND ENSEMBLE Grades 10-11-12

Wind ensemble is a full-year course offering advanced student musicians challenging opportunities to develop many aspects of performance. The music performed at an advanced high school/college level. The students electing for wind ensemble must pass a competitive audition and/or be recommended by the director of music. Students selected will be expected to practice and study over and above what is normally required for band. Preparing for music master recitals and/or regional auditions is strongly encouraged. Also required is a bi-weekly, small group pullout lesson. Attendance at all school concerts, graduation, and CJMEA band festival is required.

WIND ENSEMBLE


TREBLE CHORUS Grades 9-10-11-12

Treble Chorus is a full-year course in which students learn the foundations of musicianship, theory and vocal technique through a variety of literature. This class will help treble students learn the basics of vocal production, through breathing, posture, phonation, and diction with emphasis on the particulars of the treble voice. Much time is spent developing the total musicianship for each student through basic music theory and sight singing. The music performed is at a traditional high school women’s chorus level. Treble Chorus students also constitute a chief resource for the spring musical. For students who wish to excel, auditions for activities such as Chamber Choir, Regional, All-State, and ACDA honor choirs will be available. Also required is a bi-weekly, small-group pull out lesson. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

TREBLE CHORUS


CONCERT CHOIR Grades 9-10-11-12

Concert Choir is a full-year course in which students learn musicianship, theory, and vocal technique through a variety of choral literature. Students learn the basics of proper vocal production through breathing, posture, phonation, and diction. The music performed is at an advanced high school level, in the context of a mixed voice (male and female) setting. Much time is spent developing total musicianship for each student through music theory and sight singing. Concert Choir students also constitute a chief resource for the spring musical. For students who wish to excel, auditions for activities such as Chamber Choir, Regional, All-State, and ACDA honor choirs will be available. Also required is a bi-weekly, small-group pullout lesson. Attendance at all school concerts is required.

CONCERT CHOIR


STRING ORCHESTRA Grades 9-10-11-12

String Orchestra is a full-year course offering string musicians challenging opportunities to develop many aspects of performance, and it gives players experience in studying and performing a wide variety of music. Advanced techniques are practiced in every rehearsal. Prominent among these elements are intonation, articulation, rhythmic precision, dynamic variety, bowing techniques, balance among sections, flexibility in following a conductor, and nuance of phrasing. The most proficient wind and percussion players from wind ensemble are selected to combine with the string orchestra to form the Summit High School Symphony Orchestra. More advanced string students are encouraged to audition for the SHS Chamber Orchestra, which meets weekly in the evening. The most advanced students will form the Hilltop String Quartet. Preparing for music master recitals and region/All State auditions is strongly encouraged. There is a required bi-weekly pullout program. Attendance at all concerts is required.

Strings


MUSIC THEORY/ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY Grades 11-12

Music Theory/AP Music Theory is a full-year course giving student musicians the opportunity to understand the fundamental concepts of how music is constructed. Traditional performance-based ensembles (band, chorus, and

orchestra) do not have the time to study the complex underlying relationships found within music. This course provides the time. The major emphasis is focused on harmony and how it has changed through the centuries. Through classroom lecture, active listening, student composition, and guided practice, students gain an insight into the building blocks of music.

MUSIC THEORY

ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY


INTRO TO THEATRE Grades 9-10-11-12

Intro to Theatre is a one-semester course that serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of acting and play production and offers exposure to a variety of dramatic texts. The major emphasis in the classroom is the introduction of basic acting techniques, theatre criticism, improvisation, stage diction, and movement. Students build the specific skills used in developing characterization and analyzing scenes. Student actors employ these skills in improvisational exercises and scene work. A general overview of other facets of theatre including technical, design, and theatre history, as well as the opportunity to participate in various workshops, master classes, and theatre field trips is also provided. Participation on some level, either as cast or crewmember, in school productions is required.

Being revised Summer 2104


THEATRE 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Theater 1 is a full-year course that serves as an introduction to the fundamentals of acting on stage and on film. Students are exposed to play production, stage terminology, and a variety of dramatic texts, and explore a variety of acting techniques that will assist them in recreating human behavior for the performance of any role on the stage or on the screen. The major emphasis in the classroom is the introduction of basic acting techniques, stage diction and movement. Students build specific skills used in developing characterization and analyzingscenes through improvisational exercises and scene work. A general overview of other facets of theatre including technical, design, directing, audition techniques, and musical theatre, as well as the opportunity to work in the SHS television studio filming their work for critique and for production on the SHS television channel are provided. Students also have the opportunity to participate in various workshops, master classes, and theatre field trips. Participation on some level, either as a cast or crewmember, in the school productions is required.

Being revised Summer 2104


ADVANCED THEATRE Grades 10-11-12

Advanced Theatre is a full-year course that builds on the skills gained in the first theater course and continues with more intense acting, forensic interpretation performance, audition, directing, film acting, and technical theatre skills and projects. Studies include an in-depth study of various acting techniques, classical acting styles and acting for film. The acting student works in the SHS television studio filming their work for critique and for production on the SHS television channel. Students participate in various professional workshops, audition master classes, and theatre field trips. The course culminates in a student-directed and produced Director’s Showcase. Participation on some level, either as a cast or crewmember, in the school productions is required.

Being revised Summer 2104



Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment

World Language


New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for World Languages

(Re-adopted 2014)


In order to learn about the National Standards for World Language Education, "The Five C's" (Communication, Cultures,Comparisons, Communities, Connections), click on the link: National Standards Goals

The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) revised its proficiency guidelines for speaking, listening, reading, and writing in 2012. The guidelines describe the tasks that students can accomplish at each of the 5 major levels of proficiency. The five levels are: Distinguished, Superior, Advanced, Intermediate, and Novice. For more information, click on the link: ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines


The study of languages is an integral part of every student's academic preparation. The Summit High School world language program is comprised of Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, and Latin. Students are required by the State of New Jersey to successfully complete one year of high school world language study for graduation. Students in Summit have the opportunity to study Spanish from elementary school through their senior year, study French, Mandarin, and Latin from grade 6 through their senior year, and/or to choose a second world language in high school. Students are encouraged to further their knowledge and use of their respective languages beyond the classroom through extra-curricular clubs and cultural activities offered throughout the school year. Additionally, students are supported as they prepare to participate in local, state, and national language competitions and exams.


The primary goal of world language study is communications proficiency. In addition to enhancing understanding of English and connecting other disciplines to the world language course of study, students learn to communicate through practice and presentation in all four skill areas including reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Course content is presented thematically, with the newest curricula written using the Problem-Based Learning model, linking learning outcomes to dealing with real-life issues and situations. Units of study may include vocabulary, grammar, conversation, reading passages, writing samples, listening activities authentic media, and videos all designed to develop students’ ability to use language authentically. The cultures of the countries where the world languages are spoken are also studied through readings, authentic media, videos, and class discussions. Students begin the year with a baseline assessment and use portfolios to reflect on their progress in developing language skills and strengthening cultural awareness. All world language students are expected to use the target language to present information, interpret authentic materials in meaningful contexts, and to communicate with each other, as well as with native / heritage speakers. All students are expected to use language to connect to other communities and to view cultures from different perspectives.


Summit’s world language curriculum is aligned to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and to the National Standards for World Language Education, as well as, with the proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL). The program provides students essential knowledge and skills to be informed, contributing members of the global society.


There are many good reasons to study world languages. According to the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C., students who study even one year of foreign languages:

• Score up to 250 points higher on SATs

• Perform better on measures of verbal and non-verbal intelligence than their monolingual peers

• Develop greater cultural flexibility and sensitivity towards others

• Have larger vocabularies

• Have higher developed listening and retention skills

• Perform better on tests of reading and math

• Are more creative

• Display more highly developed thinking skills

• Possess skills critical to the national defense

• Possess skills critical to the national economy

• Are better able to compete in a global economy


World language study also:

• Gives students a competitive edge in college admissions

• Has a positive overall effect on mental development and intellectual growth

• Improves understanding of one's native tongue

• Gives a student the ability to communicate with people he/she would otherwise not have the chance to know

• Allows students the opportunity to study in another country and immerse in the culture

• Enhances employment opportunities - not only can one do a better job at conducting international business, the travel

and work become easier and more enjoyable

Language and communication are at the heart of the human experience.

The United States must educate students who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in a pluralistic American society and abroad. This imperative envisions a future in which ALL students will develop and maintain proficiency in English and at least one other language, modern or classical. Children who come to school from non-English backgrounds should also have opportunities to develop further proficiencies in their first language.

~Statement of Philosophy from The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

Ms. Ana Ventoso, Supervisor of World Language, English as a Second Language,

and Bilingual Education, PK-12

908-918-2100 X 5531

aventoso@fc.summit.k12.nj.us


FRENCH 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 1 is a full-year course that focuses on student development of communicative proficiencies and cultural

understanding. The objective of this course is for students to use French appropriately inmculturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides interesting and real-life opportunities for students to practice the skills necessary to develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.

FRENCH 1


FRENCH 2 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 2 is a full-year course designed to expand student communication skills, develop control of grammar and

vocabulary, and to develop cultural understandings through Internet and other authentic experiences. Thematic units build upon the students’ first-year experiences and cultural understandings. Students use the language for real tasks, read fiction and non-fiction selections, view Internet clips to increase comprehension, discuss daily life, and begin to extend their control of the language in guided compositions.

French 2


FRENCH 3 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 3 is a full-year course designed to continue to develop student control of the language and to extend cultural

understandings of Francophone cultures. Students improve spoken and written expression as they read, view, and discuss fiction and non-fiction selections from the French-speaking world. Problem-based learning experiences using the Internet, other authentic resources, and technology resources provide opportunities for real-time communication. Student work advances from guided to free expression in both spoken and written activities.


FRENCH 4 Grades 10-11-12

French 4 is a full-year course with units of study designed to increase student linguistic proficiencies and cultural understanding through exploration and discussion of issues using culturally authentic resources, including interfacing with students of Montpellier, France. Problem-Based Learning units support interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative skills and the reading of increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction texts. The number and length of student compositions increase, as does the use of sophisticated structures.

FRENCH 4


FRENCH 5 Honors Grades 10-11-12

French 5 Honors is a full-year course emphasizing communicative proficiency and based on the Problem-Based Learning Model. Students are expected to integrate the variety of skills built throughout the preceding levels of French and use their language skills to communicate about real-world issues. Students read, discuss, and write about literary and current fiction and non-fiction texts by French-speaking authors. Students respond to authentic materials available in print, online, and in video. Students compare and contrast perspectives on these issues with students in Montpellier, France.

Being revised summer 2014


ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH 6 Grades 11-12

AP French 6 fis a full-year course focusing on large issues such as immigration and unemployment, effects of pollution, today’s family structure, control of information, as well as French and American education models. Students are expected to integrate a wider vocabulary, more sophisticated use ofgrammar, and knowledge of French-speaking cultures to discuss these issues. Students read a wide spectrum of literature, non-fiction text, and current news sources, view Internet clips and

television programs, listen to music and news, and use all these authentic resources as vehicles for conversation with an emphasis on critical thinking. Preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in French Language focuses on fluency in French for career enhancement and global understanding. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH 6


LATIN 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Latin 1 is a full-year course that introduces classroom vocabulary, elementary Latin grammar, and vocabulary to enable the student to participate in the target language in class, to read easy selections concerning Roman life, culture, history, and mythology, some writing of simple Latin. The class emphasizes classical contributions and connections to modern life.

Latin


LATIN 2 Grades 9-10-11-12

Latin 2 is a full-year course that continues student development of basic Latin grammar and vocabulary with readings

of graduated difficulty on Roman life and mythology. Students continue to develop speaking skills and guided writing enhances student understanding of Latin constructions.


LATIN 3 Grades 9-10-11-12

Latin 3 is a full-year intermediate course that broadens the student's knowledge of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students gain increased facility with the language from reading selections about Roman life, mythology, and civilization and responding to the readings with appropriate writing. Discussion of the text includes the development of cultural and linguistic understanding.


LATIN 4 Grades 10-11-12

Latin 4 is a full-year translation course with readings of Pliny, Ovid, Plautus, Cicero, Eutropius, and Lucretius. Emphasis is placed upon strengthening the grasp of advanced Latin grammar and vocabulary, as well as extending this knowledge to include more complex forms and concepts. Films, recordings, and non-book materials are used. Literary criticism and English vocabulary comprehension development are stressed.


LATIN/LITERATURE HONORS Grades 11–12

Latin/Literature Honors is a full-year course requiring students to read both prose and verse of classical authors including Ovid, Livy, Petronius and Catullus with the objective of cultivating an appreciation for poetry, and an understanding of the literature. Students focus on the historical background of the poets' era and the influence of history on the literature, while developing an advanced understanding of literary devices and Latin grammar.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LATIN Grades 11-12

AP Latin is a full-year course requiring students to read Caesar with the objective of exploring in detail two Classical texts to understand their meaning, historical importance, cultural background, effect on modern literature, and their poetic/prose styles. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.


MANDARIN CHINESE 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Mandarin Chinese 1 is full-year course focusing on student development of communicative proficiencies, Pinyin use, character writing and decoding, and cultural understanding with the objective of students using Mandarin appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides interesting and real-life opportunities to practice the skills necessary to

develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.


MANDARIN CHINESE 2 Grades 10-11-12

Mandarin Chinese 2 is a full-year course continuing the focus of Mandarin Chinese 1 on developing communicative skills. Speaking proficiency, use of Pinyin, character writing and reading skills, as well as developing an understanding of the Chinese-speaking cultures through Internet resources and other classroom experiences. Proficiency skills and cultural understandings are taught in the context of authentic thematic units.

Mandarin Chinese 2


MANDARIN CHINESE 3 Grades 11-12

Mandarin Chinese 3 is a full-year course designed to improve student communication skills, develop student’s control of grammar and vocabulary, and to extend cultural understandings. Tasks encourage student growth in character writing, interpretation of authentic materials and resources, and communication in real life situations. The Internet, technology resources, and auxiliary materials support thematic learning. Communicative opportunities are extended with experiences both within and beyond the classroom.

Mandarin Chinese 3


MANDARIN CHINESE 4 Grades 11-12

Mandarin Chinese 4 is a full-year course designed to increase student’s linguistic skills and to explore cultural understandings through discussions and the development of wider perspectives based on fiction and non-fiction readings, Internet resources, community resources, and other culturally authentic sources. Experiences beyond the classroom support communicative skill development.

Mandarin Chinese 4


MANDARIN CHINESE 5 HONORS Grades 11-12

Mandarin Chinese 5 honors is a full-year course requiring students to interact with engaging issues and current information as they refine language proficiency, cultural understanding, and critical thinking using Problem-Based Learning methodology. Emphasis is placed on communicative proficiency. Culturally authentic resources (Internet, news, videos, etc.) are used to support learning. Students explore multiple perspectives on these issues and topics with Chinese-speaking students, community members, and e-friends.

Mandarin Chinese 5


SPANISH 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

Spanish 1 is a full-year course focusing on student development of communicative proficiencies and cultural

understanding with the objective of students using Spanish appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides engaging, real-life opportunities to practice the skills necessary to develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.

SPANISH 2 Grades 9-10-11-12

Spanish 2 is a full-year course designed to expand student communication skills, develop control of grammar and vocabulary, increase comprehension, and develop cultural understandings through reading fiction and non-fiction selections, Internet and other authentic tasks and experiences. Students begin to extend their control of the language in guided compositions. Thematic units build upon the students’ first-year experiences and cultural understandings.

Spanish 2


SPANISH 3 Grades 9-10-11-12

Spanish 3 is a full-year course designed to continue to develop student control of the language and to extend the understanding of Spanish cultures. Spoken and written expression is improved by reading, viewing, and discussing fiction and non-fiction selections from the Spanish-speaking world. Problem-based learning experiences using the Internet, other authentic resources, and technology resources provide opportunities for real-time communication. Student work product advances from guided to free expression in both spoken and written activities.

Spanish 3


SPANISH 4 Grades 10-11-12

Spanish 4 is a full-year course with Problem-Based units of study designed to increase critical thinking skills, as well as student linguistic proficiencies, and cultural understanding through exploration and discussion of issues. The use of culturally authentic resources, including interfacing with Summit’s diverse community is a focus. Interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative proficiency is emphasized, and students read increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction text. The number and length of student compositions increase, as does the use of sophisticated structures.

Spanish 4


SPANISH 5 Honors Grades 11-12

Spanish 5 Honors is a full-year course designed to enable students to interact with enaging issues and current topics as language and communicative proficiency, cultural understanding, and critical thinking skills are refined. Problem-Based Learning topics include cultural identity, immigration, meeting the challenges of environmental change, and role models and heroes. Students use culturally authentic resources (Internet, news, videos, etc.) to support their learning and explore multiple perspectives on issues and topics with Spanish-speaking students, community members and e-friends.

SPANISH 5 Honors


ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH 6 Grades 11-12

AP Spanish 6 is a full-year course where students engage with issues at an advanced level including historical and cultural causes and outcomes of immigration and emigration, personal, literary, and cultural duality, gender in Spanish literature, culture and media, and current trends in culture, politics, and policies within, and outside of the United States. Students are expected to integrate a wider vocabulary, sophisticated use of grammar, and knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures to discuss these issues. Students read a wide spectrum of literature, non-fiction text, and current news sources, view Internet clips and television programs, listen to music and news, and use these authentic resources as vehicles for conversation and critical thinking. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.


SPANISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE - HONORS Grades 11-12

Spanish Literature and Culture Honors is a full-year course designed to mirror the framework of skills and objectives outlined for the Advanced Placement Examination of Spanish Literature and Culture. Students are exposured to a variety of literary texts from across the Spanish-speaking World, including a sampling of Peninsular Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Hispanic literature. The course is reflective of an introductory college literature course in which students are encouraged to explore linguistic and cultural comparisons. The goal of this course is to provide more opportunities to extend Spanish language proficiency skills through critical reading and analytical writing and enhance opportunities to continue to develop proficiencies in all three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational), while addressing all five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language

Learning in the 21st Century. All students will have the option to take the AP exam in May, but are not required to do so.

World Language

(Re-adopted 2014)


In order to learn about the National Standards for World Language Education, "The Five C's" (Communication, Cultures,Comparisons, Communities, Connections), click on the link: National Standards Goals
The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL) revised its proficiency guidelines for speaking, listening, reading, and writing in 2012. The guidelines describe the tasks that students can accomplish at each of the 5 major levels of proficiency. The five levels are: Distinguished, Superior, Advanced, Intermediate, and Novice. For more information, click on the link: ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines


The study of languages is an integral part of every student's academic preparation. The Summit High School world language program is comprised of Spanish, French, Mandarin Chinese, and Latin. Students are required by the State of New Jersey to successfully complete one year of high school world language study for graduation. Students in Summit have the opportunity to study Spanish from elementary school through their senior year, study French, Mandarin, and Latin from grade 6 through their senior year, and/or to choose a second world language in high school. Students are encouraged to further their knowledge and use of their respective languages beyond the classroom through extra-curricular clubs and cultural activities offered throughout the school year. Additionally, students are supported as they prepare to participate in local, state, and national language competitions and exams.


The primary goal of world language study is communications proficiency. In addition to enhancing understanding of English and connecting other disciplines to the world language course of study, students learn to communicate through practice and presentation in all four skill areas including reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Course content is presented thematically, with the newest curricula written using the Problem-Based Learning model, linking learning outcomes to dealing with real-life issues and situations. Units of study may include vocabulary, grammar, conversation, reading passages, writing samples, listening activities authentic media, and videos all designed to develop students’ ability to use language authentically. The cultures of the countries where the world languages are spoken are also studied through readings, authentic media, videos, and class discussions. Students begin the year with a baseline assessment and use portfolios to reflect on their progress in developing language skills and strengthening cultural awareness. All world language students are expected to use the target language to present information, interpret authentic materials in meaningful contexts, and to communicate with each other, as well as with native / heritage speakers. All students are expected to use language to connect to other communities and to view cultures from different perspectives.


Summit’s world language curriculum is aligned to the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and to the National Standards for World Language Education, as well as, with the proficiency guidelines established by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Language (ACTFL). The program provides students essential knowledge and skills to be informed, contributing members of the global society.


There are many good reasons to study world languages. According to the Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C., students who study even one year of foreign languages:
• Score up to 250 points higher on SATs
• Perform better on measures of verbal and non-verbal intelligence than their monolingual peers
• Develop greater cultural flexibility and sensitivity towards others
• Have larger vocabularies
• Have higher developed listening and retention skills
• Perform better on tests of reading and math
• Are more creative
• Display more highly developed thinking skills
• Possess skills critical to the national defense
• Possess skills critical to the national economy
• Are better able to compete in a global economy


World language study also:
• Gives students a competitive edge in college admissions
• Has a positive overall effect on mental development and intellectual growth
• Improves understanding of one's native tongue
• Gives a student the ability to communicate with people he/she would otherwise not have the chance to know
• Allows students the opportunity to study in another country and immerse in the culture
• Enhances employment opportunities - not only can one do a better job at conducting international business, the travel
and work become easier and more enjoyable
Language and communication are at the heart of the human experience.
The United States must educate students who are linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate successfully in a pluralistic American society and abroad. This imperative envisions a future in which ALL students will develop and maintain proficiency in English and at least one other language, modern or classical. Children who come to school from non-English backgrounds should also have opportunities to develop further proficiencies in their first language.
~Statement of Philosophy from The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages
Ms. Ana Ventoso, Supervisor of World Language, English as a Second Language, and Bilingual Education, PK-12
908-918-2100 X 5531

email

FRENCH 1 Grades 9-10-11-12

French 1 is a full-year course that focuses on student development of communicative proficiencies and cultural understanding. The objective of this course is for students to use French appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides interesting and real-life opportunities for students to practice the skills necessary to develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.


FRENCH 2 Grades 9-10-11-12
French 2 is a full-year course designed to expand student communication skills, develop control of grammar and
vocabulary, and to develop cultural understandings through Internet and other authentic experiences. Thematic units build upon the students’ first-year experiences and cultural understandings. Students use the language for real tasks, read fiction and non-fiction selections, view Internet clips to increase comprehension, discuss daily life, and begin to extend their control of the language in guided compositions.


FRENCH 3 Grades 9-10-11-12
French 3 is a full-year course designed to continue to develop student control of the language and to extend cultural
understandings of Francophone cultures. Students improve spoken and written expression as they read, view, and discuss fiction and non-fiction selections from the French-speaking world. Problem-based learning experiences using the Internet, other authentic resources, and technology resources provide opportunities for real-time communication. Student work advances from guided to free expression in both spoken and written activities.

FRENCH 4 Grades 10-11-12
French 4 is a full-year course with units of study designed to increase student linguistic proficiencies and cultural understanding through exploration and discussion of issues using culturally authentic resources, including interfacing with students of Montpellier, France. Problem-Based Learning units support interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative skills and the reading of increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction texts. The number and length of student compositions increase, as does the use of sophisticated structures.


FRENCH 5 Honors Grades 10-11-12
French 5 Honors is a full-year course emphasizing communicative proficiency and based on the Problem-Based Learning Model. Students are expected to integrate the variety of skills built throughout the preceding levels of French and use their language skills to communicate about real-world issues. Students read, discuss, and write about literary and current fiction and non-fiction texts by French-speaking authors. Students respond to authentic materials available in print, online, and in video. Students compare and contrast perspectives on these issues with students in Montpellier, France.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH 6 Grades 11-12
AP French 6 fis a full-year course focusing on large issues such as immigration and unemployment, effects of pollution, today’s family structure, control of information, as well as French and American education models. Students are expected to integrate a wider vocabulary, more sophisticated use ofgrammar, and knowledge of French-speaking cultures to discuss these issues. Students read a wide spectrum of literature, non-fiction text, and current news sources, view Internet clips and
television programs, listen to music and news, and use all these authentic resources as vehicles for conversation with an emphasis on critical thinking. Preparation for the Advanced Placement Examination in French Language focuses on fluency in French for career enhancement and global understanding. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.


LATIN 1 Grades 9-10-11-12
Latin 1 is a full-year course that introduces classroom vocabulary, elementary Latin grammar, and vocabulary to enable the student to participate in the target language in class, to read easy selections concerning Roman life, culture, history, and mythology, some writing of simple Latin. The class emphasizes classical contributions and connections to modern life.


LATIN 2 Grades 9-10-11-12
Latin 2 is a full-year course that continues student development of basic Latin grammar and vocabulary with readings
of graduated difficulty on Roman life and mythology. Students continue to develop speaking skills and guided writing enhances student understanding of Latin constructions.


LATIN 3 Grades 9-10-11-12
Latin 3 is a full-year intermediate course that broadens the student's knowledge of grammatical structures and vocabulary. Students gain increased facility with the language from reading selections about Roman life, mythology, and civilization and responding to the readings with appropriate writing. Discussion of the text includes the development of cultural and linguistic understanding.


LATIN 4 Grades 10-11-12
Latin 4 is a full-year translation course with readings of Pliny, Ovid, Plautus, Cicero, Eutropius, and Lucretius. Emphasis is placed upon strengthening the grasp of advanced Latin grammar and vocabulary, as well as extending this knowledge to include more complex forms and concepts. Films, recordings, and non-book materials are used. Literary criticism and English vocabulary comprehension development are stressed.


LATIN/LITERATURE HONORS Grades 11–12
Latin/Literature Honors is a full-year course requiring students to read both prose and verse of classical authors including Ovid, Livy, Petronius and Catullus with the objective of cultivating an appreciation for poetry, and an understanding of the literature. Students focus on the historical background of the poets' era and the influence of history on the literature, while developing an advanced understanding of literary devices and Latin grammar.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT LATIN Grades 11-12
AP Latin is a full-year course requiring students to read Caesar with the objective of exploring in detail two Classical texts to understand their meaning, historical importance, cultural background, effect on modern literature, and their poetic/prose styles. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.


MANDARIN CHINESE 1 Grades 9-10-11-12
Mandarin Chinese 1 is full-year course focusing on student development of communicative proficiencies, Pinyin use, character writing and decoding, and cultural understanding with the objective of students using Mandarin appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides interesting and real-life opportunities to practice the skills necessary to
develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.


MANDARIN CHINESE 2 Grades 10-11-12
Mandarin Chinese 2 is a full-year course continuing the focus of Mandarin Chinese 1 on developing communicative skills. Speaking proficiency, use of Pinyin, character writing and reading skills, as well as developing an understanding of the Chinese-speaking cultures through Internet resources and other classroom experiences. Proficiency skills and cultural understandings are taught in the context of authentic thematic units.


MANDARIN CHINESE 3 Grades 11-12
Mandarin Chinese 3 is a full-year course designed to improve student communication skills, develop student’s control of grammar and vocabulary, and to extend cultural understandings. Tasks encourage student growth in character writing, interpretation of authentic materials and resources, and communication in real life situations. The Internet, technology resources, and auxiliary materials support thematic learning. Communicative opportunities are extended with experiences both within and beyond the classroom.


MANDARIN CHINESE 4 Grades 11-12
Mandarin Chinese 4 is a full-year course designed to increase student’s linguistic skills and to explore cultural understandings through discussions and the development of wider perspectives based on fiction and non-fiction readings, Internet resources, community resources, and other culturally authentic sources. Experiences beyond the classroom support communicative skill development.


MANDARIN CHINESE 5 HONORS Grades 11-12
Mandarin Chinese 5 honors is a full-year course requiring students to interact with engaging issues and current information as they refine language proficiency, cultural understanding, and critical thinking using Problem-Based Learning methodology. Emphasis is placed on communicative proficiency. Culturally authentic resources (Internet, news, videos, etc.) are used to support learning. Students explore multiple perspectives on these issues and topics with Chinese-speaking students, community members, and e-friends.


SPANISH 1 Grades 9-10-11-12
Spanish 1 is a full-year course focusing on student development of communicative proficiencies and cultural
understanding with the objective of students using Spanish appropriately in culturally authentic situations. Theme-based work provides engaging, real-life opportunities to practice the skills necessary to develop novice proficiencies in interpretive, interpersonal, and presentational language skills.
SPANISH 2 Grades 9-10-11-12
Spanish 2 is a full-year course designed to expand student communication skills, develop control of grammar and vocabulary, increase comprehension, and develop cultural understandings through reading fiction and non-fiction selections, Internet and other authentic tasks and experiences. Students begin to extend their control of the language in guided compositions. Thematic units build upon the students’ first-year experiences and cultural understandings.


SPANISH 3 Grades 9-10-11-12
Spanish 3 is a full-year course designed to continue to develop student control of the language and to extend the understanding of Spanish cultures. Spoken and written expression is improved by reading, viewing, and discussing fiction and non-fiction selections from the Spanish-speaking world. Problem-based learning experiences using the Internet, other authentic resources, and technology resources provide opportunities for real-time communication. Student work product advances from guided to free expression in both spoken and written activities.


SPANISH 4 Grades 10-11-12
Spanish 4 is a full-year course with Problem-Based units of study designed to increase critical thinking skills, as well as student linguistic proficiencies, and cultural understanding through exploration and discussion of issues. The use of culturally authentic resources, including interfacing with Summit’s diverse community is a focus. Interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational communicative proficiency is emphasized, and students read increasingly complex fiction and non-fiction text. The number and length of student compositions increase, as does the use of sophisticated structures.


SPANISH 5 Honors Grades 11-12
Spanish 5 Honors is a full-year course designed to enable students to interact with enaging issues and current topics as language and communicative proficiency, cultural understanding, and critical thinking skills are refined. Problem-Based Learning topics include cultural identity, immigration, meeting the challenges of environmental change, and role models and heroes. Students use culturally authentic resources (Internet, news, videos, etc.) to support their learning and explore multiple perspectives on issues and topics with Spanish-speaking students, community members and e-friends.


ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH 6 Grades 11-12
AP Spanish 6 is a full-year course where students engage with issues at an advanced level including historical and cultural causes and outcomes of immigration and emigration, personal, literary, and cultural duality, gender in Spanish literature, culture and media, and current trends in culture, politics, and policies within, and outside of the United States. Students are expected to integrate a wider vocabulary, sophisticated use of grammar, and knowledge of Spanish-speaking cultures to discuss these issues. Students read a wide spectrum of literature, non-fiction text, and current news sources, view Internet clips and television programs, listen to music and news, and use these authentic resources as vehicles for conversation and critical thinking. All students enrolled in an AP class are required to take the AP exam in May.


SPANISH LITERATURE AND CULTURE - HONORS Grades 11-12
Spanish Literature and Culture Honors is a full-year course designed to mirror the framework of skills and objectives outlined for the Advanced Placement Examination of Spanish Literature and Culture. Students are exposured to a variety of literary texts from across the Spanish-speaking World, including a sampling of Peninsular Spanish, Latin American and U.S. Hispanic literature. The course is reflective of an introductory college literature course in which students are encouraged to explore linguistic and cultural comparisons. The goal of this course is to provide more opportunities to extend Spanish language proficiency skills through critical reading and analytical writing and enhance opportunities to continue to develop proficiencies in all three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational), while addressing all five goal areas (communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities) as outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language
Learning in the 21st Century. All students will have the option to take the AP exam in May, but are not required to do so.
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